HASE 1 NOTE

The 9th Chief Cashier, Henry Hase was known as the reluctant Chief Cashier. He entered service on 28 March 1793 and was appointed Chief Cashier on 17 September 1807 following the disgrace of the second cashier Robert Aslett who was found guilty of embezzling half a million pounds. Hase died on 26 March 1829, aged 65.

Early Bank of England notes were part printed with the date, no., and amount left to be written in by hand. From 1725, 14 denominations were printed although space was left for odd amounts to be written in. These amounts were: 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90, 100, 200, 300, 400, 500 and 1,000. In 1759 10 and 15 denominations were added and in 1765, 25.

In 1793 the Napoleonic War with France was causing economic difficulties and small denomination notes were considered necessary. A 5 note was introduced in 1793 and 1 and 2 notes in 1797.

After 1803, the 60, 70, 80, 90, and 400 notes were no longer issued. The 15 and 25 were withdrawn in 1822, 1 and 2 in 1826, 40 in 1851 and 30 in 1852.

The 300 note was discontinued before 1893 and the 200 in 1918.

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