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In 1966 William Hartnell was not a well person. He was diagnosed as suffering from

The Cybermen came to prominence during Troughton's era

arteriosclerosis and was finding it difficult to meet the demands of the hectic schedule for

Doctor Who. Then producer Innes Lloyd decided that it would be best to replace Hartnell with another actor, and came up with the idea of him being able to rejuvenate his body. This idea would ultimately stretch the life span of the show way past any other programme with such a small principle cast.

Patrick Troughton as chosen as the new Doctor. His bumbling, fatherly portrayal boosted the flagging ratings, and the change in the shows style to a more 'monster of the week' setting invigorated it. This era also introduced many favourite monsters and ideas such as the sonic screwdriver, the Cybermen and the Ice Warriors.


Stories:

Season 4

The Imps

The People who Couldn't Remember

The Herdsmen of Venus
Season 5

Operation Werewolf

 

 

Season 6

The Impersonators

 

The Laird of the Clan McCrimmon

 

Aliens in the Blood

The Prison In Space

The Dream Spinner

Untitled (Underwater)
The Destroyers    

The Imps

by: William Emms
Episodes: 4
Submitted for: Season 4

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The People Who Couldn't Remember

by: David Ellis
Episodes: 4
Submitted for: Season 4

Notes: David Ellis submitted this satirical storyline in June 1966. It was rejected by story editor Gerry Davis on the grounds that it contained too much humour which he sought to avoid after 'The Gunfighters'.

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The Herdsmen of Venus

by: Donald Cotton
Episodes: unknown
Submitted for: Season 4

Story: It is revealed that the Loch Ness Monster a form of alien cattle herded by Venusian farmers in their flying saucers.

Notes: This storyline was submitted in June 1966, however was rejected for being 'too silly'. Cotton later described it as absurd.

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The Dream Spinner

by: Paul Wheeler
Episodes:
Companions: Jamie, Zoe
Submitted for: Season 6

Story:
Revolved around an old traveller who could make people believe that their dreams had actually happened.

Notes:
Derrick Sherwin rejected this story on the grounds that it was too close to 'The Mind Robber', which had just been made. It was replaced by 'The Prison In Space' and ultimately by The Krotons.

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The Prison in Space

by: Dick Sharples
Episodes: 4
Companions: Jamie, Zoe
Submitted for: Season 6

Story:  Deciding that they need a holiday, the Doctor lands TARDIS in what appears to be vast tranquil countryside. The three pack a picnic hamper and head outside, however, almost as soon as they unpack they hear a pained cry. They quickly drag the picnic into a bush and hide where they observe a ragged man covered in blood being chased by a woman, Captain Mavis, dressed in what looks to be a mixture of go-go girl fashion and a military uniform. Obviously weak, the man is unable to keep ahead of his pursuer and is dragged away by two of her subordinates. Mavis notices a picnic cup lying on the grass and studies it carefully.

Once they have gone the Doctor, Jamie and Zoe emerge from the bushes and make their escape back to the TARDIS. As the Doctor opens the doors Captain Mavis emerges, gun in hand. They make a run for it but they come to an abrupt halt when they are faced with a six foot high wall bocking their path. Jamie and the Doctor give Zoe a lift up so she can get over the wall but to her amazement she finds that she isn't in the countryside at all, but the roof-garden of a huge skyscraper in the middle of a city. Captain Mavis catches up with them and demands to know why they are on the President's roof-garden, taking special interest in Zoe's response.

The Doctor and Jamie are taken to the cells by two go-go girl guards but Zoe is taken elsewhere. When the Doctor asks what is to happen to her he is told that although Zoe is a traitor she 'is still a woman'. In the cell the Doctor finds the man they saw being captured, Albert, and two others, Mervyn and Garth. The guards inform the prisoners that they will soon be tried in court for their crimes.

A little while later all five are called for trial, where the imposing figure of Chairman Babs sits in judgement. Zoe is also there, but she is made to stand seperate from the rest of the group. One by one the men are sentenced to death for their various crimes: Albe

The Doctor faces up to Captain Mavis

rt for entering an unauthorized area, Mervyn for publicly insulting the leader by calling her 'a big fat ugly old bat' and Garth for daring to refuse a woman who had selected him for marriage. The Doctor takes the dock, and rails against such an unfair and sexist system of justice. Aware that they are aliens, Chairman Babs explains that woman became the dominant sex 300 years ago, banned war and developed drugs that could indefinitely prolong life. Since then men have become largely irrelevant to their society and have allowed themselves to be cowed. Furious, the Doctor tells Babs that instead of treating men like livestock they should be helping them regain their place in society. Aghast at the Doctor's insolent behaviour, she sentences them to life on the the planet's prison satellite along with Mervyn Gareth and Albert.

Zoe is taken to be rehabilitated in the customs of the planet. After a short time she befriends her instructors and talks to them about what it is like to be a woman on her planet. The women find this lifestyle somewhat appealing, and excitedly ask Zoe to tell them more. Unbeknownst to them Chairman Babs and Captain Mavis are watching them through a secret monitor; concerned that Zoe may cause contention among the women, Babs decides to use a more effective method of rehabilitating Zoe, a conditioning machine. The Guards are ordered to take Zoe to the conditioning machine and she is strapped in and the machine is turned on. The cubicle fills with smoke and when it clears Zoe emerges, blank faced and totally brainwashed.

Meanwhile the Doctor, Jamie and their companions have landed on the prison moon. Upon disembarking they are greeted by two guards and taken to their cells. The Doctor insists that there must be a way of getting off the moon and back to the planet to collect Zoe and the TARDIS, but Jamie thinks it's impossible since the only way they would have even the slightest chance to get off the planet would be if they were women and could disguise themselves as guards. Smiling slyly, the Doctor agrees. Jamie see what the Doctor is driving at, and point blank refuses to dress up as a girl but the Doctor points out that he would be the most likely able to get away with it, and it would be their only chance to escape. exasperated and a little embarrassed, Jamie concedes.

Guards arrive and they are taken for their occupational therapy class where they are encouraged to make little works of art. The Doctor has an idea, he asks for some copper wire so that he might make a sculpture, an embarrassed Jamie asks for materials to make a dress, garvin asks for some chemicals to do some experiments and Mrvyn ask for some woodworking materials. At the end of the class the inmates hide some of the materials about their person and go back to their cells.

In the conditioning room a sleeping Zoe is being watched by the two instructors. Looking down on the girl, they regret what happened to her, and feel a life where they could embrace their feminine qualities was one that they perhaps would like to lead. Quick as a flash Zoe bounces up from the table and the pair realise that they have been overheard. Zoe's conditioning has been a total success.

Back in the cells the prisoners are able to make a slightly convincing guards uniform and a dummy gun from the items that they brought back with them from the class. Also, using the chemicals from the experiment, Garvin has made a smoke bomb which he gives to Jamie. The Doctor takes some of the wire he smuggled out and uses it unlock the door to the cell which causes it to open, and all the lights to go out.

Jamie dashes out into the corridor, but he doesn't get very far before he hears the rumble of guards behind him and quickly takes cover. As they pass him he joins the back of the phalanx and they march to the control room where Babs and Captain Mavis order them search sector 42 for the culprit. As this is happening Jamie notices that there is a plan of the prison hanging on the wall of the room.

Babs dimisses the troops and Jamie decides to seize his chance. He covers his face and throws the smoke bomb to the floor. In the confusion Jamie grabs the plan of the complex and runs back to the cell. Inside the cell the Doctor tells him to close the cell door by pressing the button on the outside. Jamie does so, but instead of closing the door, Jamie is hit by a beam of light and collapses. The Doctor drags him inside and manages to close the cell door using the copper wire.

Mervyn and Albert shake Jamie round and he quickly gets back into his prison garb before the guards come round to check the cell. When they move on, the Doctor examines the plans for the prison and he realises that the communication lines run right underneath their cell. The guards that searched the Doctor's cell report back to chairman babs that the Doctor's cell was locked and nothing was found. Zoe however, is still convinced that The Doctor was responsible for the disruption.

Jamie is able to prise one of the floor slabs open to reveal a mass of cables underneath. The Doctor constructs a microphone from leftover bits they brought back from the recreation area, connects the microphone to one of the wires and and instructs the prisoners via the prison intercom that now is the time to revolt and that when he opens the prison doors they must overthrow the guards. Albert uses one of the cables to fuse the electrical systems and the doors fly open. The prisoners quickly overthrow the guards and the doctor demands that the prisoners be given amnesty. Babs, safely locked in the control chamber, has no choice but to agree. Strangely the prison guards all cheer.

Babs informs the doctor that she will send up an ambassador with the relevant papers. When the ambassador arrives The Doctor is delighted to find that it is Zoe, now apparently returned to her normal self. Zoe says that she has a 'special message' for the guards from Chairman Babs and produces a concealed gun and levels it at The Doctor. She instructs the guards to seize Jamie, Mervyn and Albert. Too stunned to retaliate the prisoners have no choice but to return to their cells. The Doctor Jamie Albert and Mervyn are taken to Babs who sentences them to be shot out into space in a capsule and left on a distant planet. Smiling, Zoe asks if she an be the one to push the button and Babs agrees.

The prisoners are led to one of the space capsules and fired off the planet. In what seems like only a short time they are ejected from the capsule and descend by parachute to the ground.

Pulling themselves together, they are surprised to find chairman Babs hiding in a set of bushes, Jamie is confused. Babs makes a run for it just before guards appear and roughly haul her away. The Doctor realises that they are back on the planet. Laughing the guards explain that after what Zoe had told them, they realised that they had had enough with their way of life. When babs shot the group into space they had mounted a revolt, turned the Doctor's capsule around and deposed Chairman babs.

The guards bring the group back to the city where babs is strapped into the conditioning chair. Horrified The Doctor protests but it is too late, one of the guards flips the switch. When Babs comes to she looks around her and her eyes come to rest on the Doctor, and dewey eyed, proclaims him to be the man of her dreams. The Doctor runs for the TARDIS and Jamie grabs Zoe and quickly follows.

Once inside the TARDIS, Zoe, still conditioned, starts screaming and banging the doors to get out. A plainly annoyed Jamie says that if she is deciding to act like a child, she might as well be treated like one. He then promptly picks her up and spanks her bottom, the shock of which breaks her conditioning.

Notes: Commisioned by Peter Bryant to be a full on comedy, this story got as far as preliminary casting before it was eventually replaced by 'The Krotons'.


The Impersonators

by: Malcolm Hulke
Submitted for: Season 6

Story: The Doctor, Jamie and Zoe arrive back on Earth where they discover that Aliens have infiltrated and are controlling the humans to their own ends through mind control.

Notes: Malcolm Hulke (who had previously co-written The Faceless Ones), submitted this story idea in June 1968. He was commissioned for a detailed breakdown in July, and was duly paid for it. Little work seems to have been done on it until November, by which time Derrick Sherwin’s season finale fell through. It was decided to expand Hulke’s storyline to ten episodes, with story editor Terrance Dicks co-writing it with him. With additional input from director David Maloney and producer Derrick Sherwin, The War Games was born. The Impersonators was formally written off in December, and The War Games commissioned in its place.


Operation Werewolf

by: Robert Kitts and Douglas Camfield
Submitted for: Season 5

Episode 1: The Secret Army
Episode 2: Chateau Of Death
Episode 3: Lair Of The Werewolf
Episode 4: Friend Or Foe
Episode 5: Village Of The Swastika
Episode 6: Crossfire

The TARDIS lands in Normandy in 1944, six days before D Day, and while investigating the Doctor is captured by Germans, along with local resistance leader Jules Perrier. Meanwhile, Jamie and Victoria meet up with the resistance who believe they have been sent by the English. The resistance tells them about the strange experiments being conducted at a nearby chateau by Dr Hans Gruber under the control of Ulrich Schneider, head of Gestapo in France. After an argument, Francoise Perrier, daughter of Jules, goes with Jamie to the German HQ, while Victoria stays behind with Pierre Dubois.

Inside the HQ the Doctor and Jules are questioned by Kurt Muller, the local German commandant, and both deny that they are partisans. Leni Bruckner, aide-de-camp to Schneider, arrives and takes the Doctor and Jules to the chateau. Here the Doctor is shown a machine which he is told is capable of transporting bodies through the fourth dimension. He then learns that the machine is to be used to send a small group of Germans to England to immobilize the Allied armies that have gathered in the South of England. They plan to do this by firing small V1 rockets filled with paralyzing gas from sites in England onto the Allied forces and then to use a high ultrasonic radio wave to brainwash the Allied soldiers into becoming Nazi conquerors of England.

Gruber decides to give a demonstration of the machine, using Jules as the subject, but Jules attempts to escape and is shot. Meanwhile Jamie and Francoise, who have followed the Doctor and Jules to the chateau, are discovered, and although Francoise manages to escape Jamie is captured. Gruber then decides to use Jamie to demonstrate the machine, but the Doctor has observed that the machine is not asjusted correctly and to save Jamie’s life manages, unobserved, to make the required adjustments. Francoise, on her way back to the resistance HQ, meets up with Dr Fergus McCrimmon, a British agent who has been sent to investigate by MI5. He tells her that a commando raid has been organized in conjunction with the resistance attack on the chateau. They arrive at the HQ and Fergus wirelesses London, speaking to his supervisor Aubrey Fanshaw Smith and confirming the raid.

In the chateau Gruber sends Bruckner through the machine to England where it is revealed that the Nazi base there is headed by Fanshaw Smith who, in reality, is a Nazi agent.

In France the resistance HQ is raided by the Germans and Pierre and Victoria are captured and taken to the chateau where they are brainwashed into being Nazis and left to guard the Doctor and Jamie, who are in a dungeon.

Meanwhile, with the machine operational, Gruber starts sending soldiers to England. The following night Francoise and Fergus – who had escaped the raid along with other partisans – meet up with the commandos and attack the chateau. They overpower Pierre and Victoria and free the Doctor and Jamie but Gruber escapes through the machine to England. The Doctor, Jamie and Fergus follow, but find themselves surrounded by German soldiers.

In France the attack is beaten off with Francoie being captured by Schneider. The commandos – who have broken the brainwashing of Pierre and Victoria – plan to attack again. In England the Doctor manages to escape, but is recaptured by Bruckner and on his return finds that Jamie and Fergus have also escaped and managed to warn the British army. Fanshaw Smith breaks down upon learning this and is shot by Bruckner when he tries to sabotage the machine. In the confusion Gruber escapes through the machine followed by the Doctor. They arrive in the chateau just as Schneider is about to torture Francoise. As Schneider and Gruber argue, the Doctor frees her and they escape. As this occurs the commandos attack the chateau and at the same time – in England – the army, with Jamie and Fergus, attack the English base.

Jamie and Fergus arrive in the operations room and are held at gunpoint by Bruckner who is about to throw the switch to launch the V1 rockets. Jamie jumps at her, knocking the gun from her hand and causing her to fall backward onto the machine. At the same time in France, Schneider decides to escape through the machine after Francoise has killed Gruber. He enters the machine at the same time as Bruckner and they deflect each other from their intended destinations and disappear.

In England, Fergus tries to drag Jamie away as the house is about to be blown up, but Jamie is ordered by the Doctor to return to France via the machine. Fergus escapes, thinking that Jamie is killed when the house explodes. In France everyone hurries out of the chateau, which Francoise and Pierre had dynamited.

The Doctor and his companions return to the TARDIS with the help of the partisans where they fight a pitched battle with the Germans who panic when the TARDIS dematerializes. At this point the victorious partisans cheer as they see the arriving Allied invasion fleet. It is the morning of June 6th – the D Day landings have begun…

Notes: This story was conceived in 1965 by director Douglas Camfield and fellow BBC worker Robert Kitts after Camfield’s dismay at another sub-standard script,, and would probably have been directed by Camfield himself. It went through several rewrites until 1967 when it was finally abandoned due to producer Innes Lloyd moving on and the writers both having other commitments. It is interesting to note that this story was given individual episode titles even though this practice had stopped with 'The Savages' in 1966.


The Laird of the Clan McCrimmon

by: Mervyn Haisman and Henry Lincoln
Episodes: 4
Companions: Jamie, Zoe
Submitted for: Season 6

Story: A strange force compels Jamie to pilot the TARDIS to Scotland in 1746 where the Doctor, Jamie and Zoe find themselves isolated from their ship by a forcefield. They arrive at the foreboding Castle McCrimmon, Jamie's ancestral home near a misty loch. There they are met by Duncan, Factor to the ailing Laird, Sir James McCrimmon.

Jamie shows Zoe around and she notices some strange cattle which then stand up - they are Yeti. The Yeti isolate the castle and the villagers fall under the influence of the Great Intelligence. One villager, Fiona, is immune and Jamie falls in love with her. The Intelligence aims to gain control of Jamie's body and settle in the castle as the Laird of McCrimmon when Sir James dies.

The Doctor has to determine who the Intelligence is working through, with the Laird and the village sorceress being the prime candidates. It transpires that Duncan is protecting Fiona's mother, Morag - a woman with second sight.

The Intelligence is defeated and, after Sir James dies with no heirs, Jamie is the last of the clan and is therefore the obvious choice for the new Laird. Accepting his rightful inheritance and responsibility, Jamie bids a reluctant farewell to the Doctor and Zoe to remain with Fiona as the new Laird.

Notes:
This story was originally intended to be Frazer Hines' last until it was abandoned. The writers eventually withdrew this story due what what they thought was unfair treatment of their previous creations, the Quarks by the BBC.


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Aliens in the Blood

by: Robert Holmes
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 6

In the 22nd centrury a mutant human species has sprung into being in an isolated, inbred community of scientists and technologists. The community is OSCOC (Outer Space Commission Of Control) and is a super-national development of Cape Kennedy. From its remote island in the Indian Ocean, OSCOC controls and guides the movement of every ship on the interstellar spaceways. Most of the traffic at this time consists of freighters. The pioneers and settlers, the explorers and colonists, have gone out among the stars and the treasures of the universe are being ferried back to Earth for the benefit of the soft-living terrestrials. The whole structure of civilization depends on the constant flow of the new materials that space exploration has released.

Not everyone, of course, has adapted to the new ways. In various remote corners of the world there are still pockets of primitives who cling to the old life. OSCOC itself shares the island with natives, mainly fishermen and farmers, a sullen and hostile bunch in the main. But a few of them are employed in menial tasks around the OSCOC campus (OSCOC is organized like an American university with its various faculties. Its Dean is a man named Thawne. Almost as important in the hierarchy is a psychologist named Khotajhi.)

[The story opens as] The captain of a spaceship gets his course and speed from OSCOC (Outer Space Commission Of Control). He follows it, realizes that the ship is on a disaster course, and tries to contact OSCOC. But down in the OSCOC plot room his frantic SOS is switched off (we don’t see by whom) and the doomed ship plunges into an asteroid belt.

At about the time the TARDIS is materializing on the north end of the island, Dean Thawne is visited by an agent from the WIB (World Intelligence Bureau); too many freighters are vanishing mysteriously; in the past few years the hazards of space travel appear to have increased beyond all belief to the point where the fabric of Earth life, as it is now constituted, is seriously endangered; the agent clearly suspects there may be a saboteur operating inside OSCOC.

The native islanders think the TARDIS is something to do with OSCOC and show every intention of forming a lynching party for the Doctor and his friends. However, they escape and reach the safety of the campus. The welcome they receive here is far from warm, of course; outsiders are never welcome in the rarefied OSCOC atmosphere and when they turn up with the preposterous claim to being time travellers… It’s a case of the sanatorium and Dr Khotajhi.

Shortly after this the WIB agent is found dead. He has been murdered and the principal suspect is one of the native menials named Rafe. The Doctor has already had some contact with Rafe and he is quite sure the boy is innocent. Proving it to Thawne is a different matter, but it is in his attempts to do this that he first begins to worry about the mutants.

The mutants are Mark II Humans and, to the casual eye, indistinguishable from the old-fashioned kind. But they may, when the Doctor gets to know them better, have some visible physical feature like an extra-long thumb [that can be shown to the audience at the critical moment – as for instance when Zoe is about to confide all to the kindly, grey-haired grandmother who has befriended her].

The mutants are all menial prodigies and possess powers of ESP that in earlier times would have had them burnt at the stake. Counterbalancing their gifts, however, they have lost less ‘useful’ qualities. They are incapable of compassion, love, pity, tenderness – though they may counterfeit these emotions where it seems politic to do so.

They regard Mark I Humans rather as we ourselves regard the apes. Their aim is world domination. And because, at the moment, they are few in number, it is necessary for them to work secretly towards the destruction of mankind while concealing their existence. The Doctor’s task is made more difficult than usual because he can never be sure of anybody – as any moment an apparent friend can turn into a vicious and ruthless enemy. Hunted by mutants and duped Mark I Humans, helped by Rafe and the other islanders, the Doctor and his friends have some bad times before eventually they win out. [The climax is signposted as an early scene in the first episode.]

While in the sanatorium under Khotajhi’s observation, the Doctor becomes intrigued by the apparently high incidence of patients from OSCOC showing schizophrenic tendencies [This, as we learn later, is due to the fact that the mutants first become aware of their ‘group consciousness’ at about the time an ordinary lad’s voice starts to break]. Until they learn to understand and control their extra faculty, many of them tend to talk and act irrationally; they are like radios picking up too many signals at one time.

The Doctor makes use of this finally by constructing a very advanced and powerful machine similar to those used in electric shock therapy. With a captured mutant acting as control, the Doctor is able to broadcast shock treatment on the right mental wavelength and burn out the ESP centre in the brains of all the mutants. This point is reached – naturally at the very last moment when it seems nothing can stop the mutants’ final masterstroke.

Notes: The storyline was submitted by Robert Holmes in October 1968, following a telephone conversation with story editor Terrance Dicks. It was never formally commissioned and was rejected shortly after delivery. In 1977, the story (without its Doctor Who elements) was reworked as a radio serial, starring Peter Cushing and Vincent Price, although Holmes had no further input into it as he was busy as script editor on Doctor Who.


Untitled (Underwater)

by: Trevor Ray
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 6

Story:


Notes:
During his time as assistant script editor on Doctor Who, Trevor Ray came up
with the idea of doing a story set underwater. He spent three days with the
Marines at Poole and aboard the diving ship HMS Reclaim, but it was never
made because of technical difficulties. Interestingly, three years later,
the production team made The Sea Devils, including filming on HMS Reclaim!

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The Destroyers

by: Terry Nation
Submitted for: Pilot for an American series

Carson and Wayne are members of a space exploration team. They are guarding their base dome, surrounded by a force field. Despite this, the Daleks penetrate the field, killing Carson, His death alerts Wayne, Morgan and Sara Kingdom. Sara sounds the alarm, and the base erupts into violence as the Daleks attack. There are apparently no survivors.

The SSS (Special Space Security) sends in three agents to investigate. They are Captain Jason Corey, David Kingdom (Sara’s brother) and Mark Seven. Mark is in fact an android, stronger and more logical than any human being, with pedantic speech patterns. They discover Whitman still alive. He cannot identify their attackers, but tells them that they took a few prisoners; he then expires. Sara is in fact alive also, but wounded and dodging the Daleks in the jungle. The Daleks have Philip Leigh as a prisoner for interrogation. Their instrumentation detects movement at the dome, and they send a patrol out to annihilate whatever is alive there. The agents have discovered the Dalek tracks and are following them when the Daleks approach the dome. Jason, Mark and David hide in the bushes, where they are attacked by man-eating plants.

Mark makes a noise, and the Daleks blast away at the bushes before proceeding on their way to the dome. Jason and David now free themselves with their knives and go to Mark’s aid. Being a robot, he is mostly undamaged from the attack, and needs only minor repairs before he is functional again. Sara has taken refuge by accident in the cave that houses the entrance to the Daleks’ underground base. They activate their defence mechanisms, shadowy spectres that attack her, enveloping her in webbing. When she is helpless, the Daleks take her captive.

Jason, David and Mark find the cave, just ahead of the Dalek patrol returning from the dome. Their way forward is blocked by a chasm, but knowing there must be some way for the Daleks to cross it they hide, and see two Daleks activate a tubular bridge. As one crosses they jump the other, and Mark tosses it into the chasm. The first Dalek tries to return but David deactivates the bridge, sending the creature plunging into the abyss. In Dalek central control, Leigh is eliminated now that they have a better prisoner in Sara. The Black Dalek orders the ship prepared for departure. The agents arrive at the perimeter in time to see this, but not in time to stop it. The Dalek ship launches, taking Sara with it.

The invasion of earth is beginning.

Notes: By 13th November 1966, Terry Nation’s Lynstead Film Productions seemed to have been given the go-ahead to start production on the pilot episode of a half-hour Dalek film series on Monday 12th December. Impressed by Jean Marsh’s performance in The Daleks’ Master Plan, Nation intended for her to reprise the role in the new series. On 25th November, however, the BBC pulled out of the project. Throughout 1967, Nation attempted to sell the series to America’s NBC, but to no success, partly due to the poor reception to the two Aaru Dalek films and the fact that the BBC series had yet to air in the United States.
In 2004, Loose Cannon Reconstructions included a five minute ‘reconstruction’ of the pilot, along with a brief featurette on the background to it, on their ‘The Dalek Master Plan’ tape. It ‘cast’ Edward de Souza [Marc Cory in Mission To The Unknown] as Captain Jason Corey, Nicholas Courtney as David Kingdom and William Gaunt as Mark Seven.


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