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1969 was a troubled year for Doctor Who, Falling ratings, a star who was not happy with his work and a constrictive budget meant that producing stories to any standard was

The Doctor faces up to a Sea Devil

becoming a difficult exercise. In an effort to cut costs producer Derrick Sherwin decided that for the next season he would fundamentally change the format of Doctor Who and have the Doctor stuck on contemporary earth.

It was a huge gamble given that Doctor Who's prime currency was of space adventure, but one that gave the show a much needed shot in the arm. This was reflected in the ratings which steadily rose throughout the following seasons. Derrick Sherwin was unable to take the credit for this change in fortunes as he left at the end of season 6 to be replaced by Barry Letts.

Going against type, Jon Pertwees suave, dashing portrayal was very much surfing the zeitgeist of the time, borrowing from contemporaries such as Adam Adamant lives!, Doomwatch, Quatermass and James Bond in the cinema. The introduction of the UNIT family gave the Doctor an authority figure to occasionally kick against, even though the doctor was now much more of an authoritarian figure himself.


Stories:
Season 7

The Mists of Madness

The Shadow People

The Vampire Planet
Season 8
The Spare Part People

The Furies

The Gift

The Cerebroids

 

 

Season 9

The Daleks In London

The Brain Dead

The Shape of Terror

Season 10

Deathworld

Multiface

 

Season 11

Bridgehead From Space

The Automata

The Final Game



The Mists of Madness

by: Brian Wright
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 7

Story: The Doctor and Liz discover an artificially created community of humans.

Notes:
Wright submitted this storyline on spec to the production office, where he discovered that the script editor was an old school friend, Terrance Dicks. Before he could write the scripts however, he was appointed to an academic post in Bristol and the project was abandoned.



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The Shadow People

By: Charlotte and Dennis Plimmer
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 7

Notes: The Plimmers withdrew their story after a disagreement about their fee. It was then replaced by 'Inferno'.

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The Vampire Planet (or The Harvesters)

By: William Emms
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 7

Story: A purple planet enters the solar system, launching probes which land on Earth and sink rods into the ground. These Harvesters are then used to drain Earth’s energy. There is widespread panic as the Earth’s soil starts to die. The Doctor is called in by the Brigadier to investigate, and when the Harvesters are cut open using lasers the metallic Roboes descend from the vampiric planet. The Doctor traps a Roboe by sealing it in a metal room, rendering it helpless with electricity. Inside the metal body is a man from the planet Mara, who reveals that the Masters will do the same to Earth as they did to his world. The Masters of the vampire planet finally appear when they decide it is time to crush all resistance; tall and elegant, they are clad in Grecian robes and have metal casings on the skulls. Talking to the Masters, the Doctor learns that they are ignorant of nuclear fission. The Doctor dons a Roboe body and enters the Masters’ ship while the Brigadier readies IMBs to destroy the Masters’ world; he has Harvesters fitted with nuclear bombs. The Doctor informs the Masters of the Brigadier’s actions, and shows them some film of a nuclear explosion, relayed by the Brigadier. Terrified by the film, the Masters agree to leave and never return.

Notes: Emms, who had previously written ‘Galaxy 4’ for Season 3, had submitted the storyline entitled ‘The Harvesters’ during patrick Troughton’s tenure. When Pertwee took over, he resubmitted it as a UNIT story.

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The Spare Part People (or the Labyrinth/The Brain Drain)

By: Jon Pertwee and Reed de Rouen
Episodes: 7
Submitted for: Season 8

Story: The Doctor is asked by UNIT to investigate the disappearance of key figures from both sides of the Iron Curtain, all unique in their field. To become a victim of the kidnappers himself, the Doctor poses as Cambridge don Dr Jon Madden and is seized by hideous mummy-like creatures; the Brigadier, who has been shadowing the Doctor, is also captured. Both are taken aboard a Jules Verne-style submarine to a tropical city amid the snowy wastes of Antarctica. Here dwells a decadent civilization which has used the captured creative talents to create their idyllic home, using kidnapped athletes in bizarre and barbaric games – a footballer pitted against crocodiles, for example – to entertain their King and his court. The King is fascinated by the Doctor’s immortality; in order to force him to divulge the secret, he places him in a labyrinth with a dreadful monster, which the Doctor fights in Episode Six. The liberal Princess, however, gives the Doctor a thread so he can emerge from the maze. The Brigadier organizes a guerilla force of the detainees and captures the heating controls; the King and his followers freeze into statues while the kidnapped people escape the city in the submarine.

Notes: This seven-part storyline was submitted on-spec in 1970 by Pertwee and American actor/screeenwriter Reed de Rouen. It was also referred to as ‘The Labyrinth’ and ‘The Brain Drain’, but was never seriously considered for production.

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The Gift

By: Bob Baker & Dave Martin
Episodes: 6
Submitted for: Season 8

Story: Aliens crashland in Hyde Park in a skull shaped space ship.

Notes: The story was rejected for being several months late, too outlandish and expensive to produce. it was later reworked into 'The Claws of Axos'

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The Furies (or the Space War)

By: Ian Stuart Black
Episodes: 6
Submitted for: Season 8

Notes: Ian Stuart Black (who had written three serials in the 1960s) submitted this six-part storyline in 1970. He then went off to work on another project for several months and moved on to fresh ideas when he returned.

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The Cerebriods

By: Charlotte and Dennis Plimmer
Submitted for: Season 8

Story:

Notes: This six-part storyline was commissioned by script editor Terrance Dicks in early May 1970. The scripts were then commissioned in late June, but the idea was formally abandoned only five days later.

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The Daleks in London

By: Robert Sloman
Episodes: Six
Submitted for: Season 9

Notes: This story was replaced by Day of the Daleks when Barry Letts felt that he needed a guaranteed popular draw to start seaon 9

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The Brain Dead

by: Brian Hayles
Episodes: 4
Submitted for: Season 9

Story: The Ice Warriors’ new weapon is the Z beam, which can in effect reduce most substances to subzero temperatures, and when used full force, can effect absolute zero – fatal to human beings, with their high proportion of water. However, the beam is capable of pinpoint accuracy, and when aimed at the brain, freezes it, producing a zombie – easily and instantly imprinted to serve the Ice Warrior cause.
The Z beam is used first of all at the comsat, to take over the receiving station, with its vital ‘dish’. The imprinted engineers will then, under instruction, construct a giant version of the Z beam transmitter. This involves taking over a neighbouring frozen food factory, an ideal cover under which to operate until the next major step in the plan. The freeze centre transmitter is then connected to the radio dish, now rigged to transmit. The Z beam is then bounced off the immediate comsat to each of the comsat chain, and from them to all normal receiving stations throughout Earth. In an instant, the majority of Earth’s industrial, political and military organizations will be under Ice Warrior control. With major resistance wiped out, the ensuing invasion will be easy. After that, with more Z beams operating, the planet can be reconditioned to the Martian climate needed by the invaders.
The Brigadier at first suspects that the problems at the comsat station are the work of an environmental pressure group, the Isolationists, but the Doctor manages to convince him of the truth. They then fight together against the Ice Warriors, led by Commander Kulvis, and their zombies – the eponymous Brain-Dead. The Doctor finally discovers how to turn the Ice Warriors’ own weapon against them.
Freezing metals to absolute zero renders them super-conductive, with a nil resistance to voltage. Just as the critical build-up is reached for the Z beam to operate globally, the Doctor effects an electrical power connection with the transmitter resulting in the spectacular destruction of the Ice Warriors and their slaves – the Brain-Dead.


Notes:
Poor old Brian Hayles, he never had much luck did he?.

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The Shape of Terror

By: Brian Hayles
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 9

Story: rescue mission responding to an SOS call lands at an advannced research station Pi Delta 6 on the mineral-rich planet of Medusa Centaurus. Led by Commander Hallett, they investigate the apparently deserted station. Garford, Hallett’s ruthless security officer, believes that it has been attacked by pirates.
The Doctor and Jo arrive in the TARDIS and immediately fall under suspicion.
It transpires that the true culprit is the Energid, a highly refined primordial cell of neural protoplasm. Rather than using the normal method of cell growth by selective absorption, the Energid has mutated to absorb the protein and neural patterning of intelligent men. In the same way that by interlinking a series of computers greater development potential is produced, the Energid is going through a super-anabolistic phase, adding to its power by fusing into its nucleus the brains and personalities of its victims. Eventually, it will reproduce by self-division. Aware that the Doctor’s brain is a prize worth having, it retards reproduction until it can absorb his neural patterns and intellect.
As a non-cellular organism, the Energid is capable of considerable changes of shape and viscosity, but never loses its own distinctive surface texture. Thus it can echo the shape of a man, but can never become more than that. This surface could be rather like a stiffened detergent foam or egg-white, which could as easily subside into complete flatness, with all the motive qualities of ‘thin’ water.

In order to defeat the Energid, the Doctor decides that he must allow himself to become part of its neural structure. Jo and the others fear that he has become power-mad in seeking the alliance and imprison him. The Doctor’s cell is invaded by the Energid and, in a psychic nightmare, it shows him what he could achieve if he allows the absorption. From the fusion will come a new super-race, and he their supreme creator. The Doctor appears to be won over, but then reveals his true motives. He calls on the survival instincts of the absorbed men, then throws the Energid into a state of katabolism – self-destruction – thereby ending the danger.

Notes: Initially unenthusiastic, script editor Terrance Dicks later warmed to the ‘Ten Little Indians’ setting, and commented that it could be cheap to make with few sets and only one monster. Only the setting, a murder mystery set in an enclosed community, survived however, and became part of The Curse Of Peladon.

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Deathworld

By: Bob Baker and Dave Martin
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 10

Story: A game of chess is being played between Death and the High King of the Time Lords. However, the Time Lord has three white kings, one of which Death takes. This action causes an accident in the [Third] Doctor’s laboratory, and it seems that the Doctor and Jo have been vaporized. The pair find themselves in Limbo, menaced by one of Death’s many manifestations of himself. All three incarnations of the Doctor are allowed to enter the Underworld by the Time Lords as part of a super-initiative test, acting as Judas goats in the final power struggle between the Time Lords and the Forces of Evil, which have formed a Federation in alliance with Death; the Time Lords have chosen to risk the three Doctors’ lives in the hope of averting an interstellar war.

The three Doctors reason that they have to pass a test in Limbo; menaced by the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Zombies and Demons, Polyphemus, manifestations of the Seven Deadly Sins, Goddess Kali and even Spiderwoman. the [Third] Doctor realizes that all their adversaries are forms of Death. The combined efforts of all three Doctors make an escape attempt, with the First and Second Doctors sacrificing themselves so that the Third Doctor and Jo can escape.

Notes: Writers Bob Baker and Dave Martin submitted the storyline in February 1972, but script editor Terrance Dicks disliked the more surreal aspects of Limbo, noting that they would not grab the audience’s attention. In rewriting, Death became Ohm (and later Omega), a Time Lord in an anti-matter Universe, and the story which would emerge as The Three Doctors was born. Dicks pointed out, however, that the mixture of “mass suicide, corpse-filled morgues, lumbering ghastly zombies and man-eating fungus” was not going to be acceptable.

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Multiface

By: Godfrey Harrison
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 10

Notes: Whilst script editor Terrance Dicks was on leave, producer Barry Letts commissioned an experimental story idea from Godfrey Harrison, a man who was notorious for the late delivery of his material. Despite being delivered a week late, the storyline was under consideration for a year or so, before finally being written off and Harrison paid for ‘a great deal of work’ in February 1973.

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Bridgehead from Space

By: Malcom Hulke
Episodes:

Submitted for : Season 11

Story: The Doctor returns from an adventure on an alien planet to find a deserted London; the population have been largely evacuated and soon he is attacked by a strange monster. Humanoid aliens have landed and taken over, striking a deal with the British Government that they should be allowed to occupy the capital with a limited number of their own kind – and since their superior laser-type weaponry has vaporized County Hall after an ill-advised attack on their spaceships by a military twit, the government has agreed and retreated north to Harrogate. Although the aliens are playing at being the hurt party, they are bringing more troops in by spaceship each night under cover of darkness, and keep the streets of London clear using monsters which hatch from eggs and grow quickly. The Doctor joins the Brigadier in Harrogate and learns how the Prime Minister has struck a deal with the aliens to let them control the capital alone. Discovering that government representatives are allowed into London, the Doctor is given suitable documents to enter the heart of alienville where he is in great peril. The aliens’ true plan is to demand the South of England, forcing the inhabitants into the over-populated North. They will then await the next provocation from the government allowing them to make new demands, taking over the British Isles, then Europe… and eventually forcing humanity to live in Australia. With the native species hemmed in, the aliens will then drop some H-bombs on Australia, and cheerfully take over the planet’s cities and industries. The Doctor must reveal the aliens’ plan to the world.

Notes:
Malcolm Hulke submitted the story outline in December 1972. Script editor Terrance Dicks liked the idea of monsters in a deserted London, and this was the only element which remained in Hulke’s final story, 'Invasion Of The Dinosaurs'.

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The Automata

By: Robert Holmes
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 11

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The Final Game

by Robert Sloman
Episodes:
Submitted for: Season 11

Story:
In the final confrontation between The Doctor and The Master it is revealed that they are somehow different parts of the same personality, the Doctor being the Id and The Master the Ego. The Master eventually sacrifices himself to save The Doctor and his companions.

Notes: This story was to be the last featuring Roger Delgado as he had asked to be written out of the series to pursue other projects. This story was abandoned after the tragic death of Roger Delgado in Turkey in June 1973.

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