Simon's Monument.

Now in Simons Green, Lincoln


 

Some years ago I was requested by the Historic Monuments people to investigate reports that Simon’s Monument in the garden of a house in St. Peters Avenue had been painted with white paint, and if true, to request that the paint be removed.

I visited the houseowner who explained that he did not want to remove the paint as it had been applied to cover some filthy graffiti which was on it when he took up residence. He was hoping that when the paint wore off it would remove the graffiti. I was also informed that he wished it could be removed from his garden altogether.

The monument is in fact a Vista monument, meaning to be viewed in the distance, in this case on the skyline from the Ellison’s house (Boultham Hall, demolished in 1959) on the other side of Boultham Park Lake. By tradition it was always known as Simon’s Monument, and that Colonel Ellison’s horse, Simon, which he brought home from the Crimea (one of very few that were), was buried beneath it. This proved not to be the case on investigation when the monument was moved.

Simon's Monument, in its original location in a garden backing onto Boultham Park. Picture by Peter Fairweather.

Simon's Monument in its original location in a garden backing onto Boultham Park, Lincoln.

The monument in its new home, Simons Green, off Lakeview Road. (Picture: Lincolnshire Echo)
The monument in its new home, Simons Green, off Lakeview Road. (Picture: Lincolnshire Echo)
A couple of years after my visit I was informed that the monument was to be removed and that someone had offered money for it. Horrified that this piece of Boultham’s History was about to disappear, I consulted Councillor Mrs. Baldock who felt the same way as I did, and she brought the matter up in council. The monument was subsequently moved onto Simon’s Green on the Simon’s Hill Estate (Lakeview Road, St. Peter’s Avenue, Simons Green and at a later date Grainsby Close, built on the old cricket field).

On 3rd April The Gossiper, Lincolshire Echo, featured an article on this monument and Peter Brown suggested that a plaque be attached to explain its history, and that it should be mentioned in the city's tourist guides.

I agree that a plaque stating what it is would be ideal, but I did not press that point at the time, my concern being that the monument should not be allowed to leave the parish.

I even offered that if nowhere else could be found, it could be placed at the bottom of my own garden, built on another part of the old Ellison Estate near the Skellingthorpe Road junction.

 


This site is a work in progress. This page last updated 3rd April1999.


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