Henna by Premila
Henna Artist London UK
  
 

Henna (Mehndi) is part and parcel of a woman's life especially during festivals and weddings. The role of henna goes much beyond cosmetic and aesthetic value. Henna has a deeper meaning to the women.

The night before a wedding is known as the 'Night of Henna (Mehndi) when the bride's hands and feet are decorated in elaborate floral and traditional designs.

On the henna night, relatives and friends (married as well as unmarried) of the bride gather at the bride's house. While henna is being applied the bride is enlightened about the mysteries of married life. Many a folks songs are woven around henna nights signifying the departure of the bride to her husband's house and thus beginning an important stage of woman's life.

There are many stories about the longevity of henna on the bride's hand. It is said that if the henna lasts longer on the bride's hands it indicates that the bride is treated well at her in-laws' place, sparing her from the household chores, at least on the first few days of her married life. The bride's mother feels a sense of relief when the daughter visits her few days after the wedding and still able to see the
henna design on her daughter's palm.

In some regions of India henna paste is also used to stain the bridegroom's palms. Because the deep red left on the skin when the dried past is washed off is the colour that symbolises the deep love between the husband and wife.

Girls and women of all ages use henna. It especially signifies married women. Widows generally do not apply henna on their hands.


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