Silver-washed Fritillary (Argynnis paphia)

Male. The dark lines on the forewing make males of this species easy to distinguish.
Male. The dark lines on the forewing make males of this species easy to distinguish.
Female. Can be confused with Dark Green Fritillary
Female. Can be confused with Dark Green Fritillary
Male underside
Male underside
 
Information

NERC Act S41: Not listed
Local status: Established in the county in the last decade and now becoming widespread. In 2006 there was a large influx from outside the county, possibly combined with local breeding success.
Size: Large.
Larval foodplant: Violets
No. of broods: One
Flight time(s): Early July to late August
Winter: Larva hibernate after hatching
Habits: Males relentlessly patrol looking for females, pausing only briefly for nectar. Females are more secretive and are less often seen. Eggs are laid 1-2m up a tree, from where the larvae descend to the ground in the spring to eat violets.
Habitats: Woodlands with a semi-open canopy with dappled shade and sunny rides or glades. May be found wandering anywhere, occasionally in gardens.
Take care to dinstinguish from Dark Green Fritillary.
Distribution:

Normalized Weekly Abundance


Flight time graph


No. of Adults

Number of adults
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No. of Records

Number of records
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Percentage of all records

Percentage of all butterfly records
No. of adults per 10,000 records

Number of adults in every 10,000 butterfly records (of all species)