The Crows - Gee

 

1953 SCM 5119 Columbia label . The rarest  of  all doo wop 7 inch records. Rated by the Record Collector Lists as the 7th rarest record of all time. This record is so rare, that most collectors  & dealers have never seen it. Its existence is legendary and was once thought not to exist at all.

This copy was won from Ebay in December 2006, from a dealer who was selling it on the behalf of a friend who originally purchased a box of records from a car boot sale somewhere in Lancashire for a few pounds. In this box was this record. Quite a nice find! The dealer told me that he has a friend who is quite a big collector in America who claims that there are only ten other copies traceable in the world. This one makes eleven. That's how rare it is.

The Crows - Gee is listed in the 2006 Record collector guide as being worth 3000.00.  This copy  plays quite well with a few clicks here & there.

The Crows formed in Harlem, New York and comprised of members Daniel "Sonny" Norton (lead), Bill Davis (baritone-tenor), Harold Major (tenor), Gerald Hamilton (bass) and Mark Jackson (tenor, guitar). The Crows have gained a place in history as makers of one of the first rock 'n' roll hits, "Gee", by virtue of the fact that as an R&B record it crossed over onto the pop charts & a white audience and the new music known as Rock & Roll.. Because of its early date, early 1954, many historians of popular music consider it to be the first rock 'n' roll record. The group formed in 1952 as the Four Notes, and recorded for Jubilee without success. In 1953 they signed with George Goldner to record for his Rama label. Their debut, "Seven Lonely Days", did nothing. The second release, destined to make history, paired "Gee" with a ballad, "I Love You So", and that too failed, initially (Goldner's faith in "I Love You So" was justified in 1958 when the Chantels made it a big hit). The group's third release featured a good, deep, street-corner sound, pairing two remakes, "Heartbreaker" (a ballad originally recorded by the Heartbreakers) and "Call A Doctor" (a jump originally done by the Cap-Tans as "Chief Turn The Hose On Me"). In early 1954, "Gee" (number 2 R&B, number 14 pop) started climbing the charts and the Crows had their first, and last, hit. After subsequent records failed, such as the marvellous "Untrue" (1954), the Crows broke up.

 

 

Listen to the song here  Crows - Gee (The actual version from the record shown above)

Crows - Gee

Do do-do do, do-do do, do-do  do-do-do
Do do-do do, do-do do, do-do  do-do-do
Do do-do do, do-do do, do-do  do-do-do do
Love that girl

O-o-o-o-o Gee, my o-o Gee, well o-o Gee
Why I love that girl, love that girl

O-o-o-o-o please, listen to me, hear-hear-hear my plea
Why I love that girl

Hold me, Baby, squeeze me
Never let me go
I'm not takin' chances
Because I love her,  I love her so-o

O-o-o Gee, yes I love her, Yes I need her
Why I love that girl, love that girl

Hold me, Baby, squeeze me
Never let me go
I'm not takin' chances
Because I love her,  I love her so-o

My-my o Gee, well o Gee, my-eye o Gee
Why I love that girl, love that girl

O-o-o-o-o please, listen to me, hear-ear my plea
Why I love that girl, love that girl

Why I love that girl

 

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