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Da2c Software Projects

Discontinued projects

APHont Browser

A browser/reader for 'low vision' users. The APHont high readability font is embedded in this app allowing its use in portable applications.

Status: This project is in active development.

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AutoCue/TelePrompt

Displays HTML pages inverted for use in 'Pepper's Ghost' type Autocues (UK) or TelePrompts (USA)

Status: This project is in active development.

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BSL Primer

A simple 'flashcard' system to assist in learning British Sign Language (BSL).

Status: This project is in active development.

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Discontinued projects

NiMF (Non-installing Maintenance Freeware)

Written in Object Pascal using a free copy of Delphi v4 Standard from a magazine cover disc. (PC Plus, Jan 2001) The final version, NiMF v8.00 was produced in 2005 although it continued in intermittent use until finally being completely replaced by Da2c's Tech Support - Help Desk disc.

Originally intended as a technician's toolkit containing hardware/software auditing, repair and maintenance software applications, the contents of the disc grew into a much more general purpose utility so that later versions contained various useful things like: emergency telephone numbers for internet dialup accounts, a collection of audio files designed to test, amongst other things, whether the left and right loudspeakers were the right way round, a collection of utilities not found on a clean installation of Windows but which were necessary nevertheless, such as unzippers, pdf readers, anti-virus utilities, password revealers, back-up and file recovery utilities, etc.

The picture shows the main screen used for setting-up and calibrating a monitor. The animated green scanning light at the bottom of the screen indicated a system lock-up.

Although based on the functionality of NiMF v8, the later Da2c's Tech Support - Help Desk disc is more user friendly and safer in non-techie hands.

Status: This project has been superceded.

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Bandwidth Calculator

These are very approx results. There are usually too many variables to calculate download times accurately. 56kbps is only ever a theoretical maximum.

My calculations are based on the following: I've assumed that a 56k modem connection is actually working between 45Kbps and 34Kbps. (Companies specialising in streaming media (eg RealNetworks) suggest 34Kbps for a 56Kbps dial-up modem. Adobe Photoshop ('Save for Web' dialog) appears to assume around 45Kbps in its calcs.)

File sizes are usually expressed in K for Kilobytes. A Kilobyte (abbreviated either K or KB) is one thousand bytes, a byte is eight bits, a bit (short for "binary digit") is the smallest unit of measure of file size (literally a 1 or 0 in binary code).

Transmission rates are measured in the number of bits that can be sent through a network within a given period of time. Transmission rates are expressed in kilobits per second, or thousand-bits per second. You may see this abbreviated kbps or Kbps.

Re-read the last two sentences. Transmission rates are measured in kilobits (not Kilobytes) per second.

A 56k modem (more precisely a 56kbps modem) is theoretically moving only 7 Kilobytes of data every second (56,000 bits = 7,000 bytes).

As an example, suppose you had a 50 KiloByte image:

First, convert the storage measurement to the "transmission" measurement (Kilobytes to Kilobits). 50KBytes of file size times 8 (8 bits in a Byte) equals 400Kilobits of filesize.

Then you divide the filesize by the probable available bandwidth. If a 56Kbps modem delivers about 34Kbps of bandwidth, then, 400Kilobits divided by 34Kilobits per second equals roughly 12 (11.76) seconds. The same file transmitted at 45Kilobits per second would take approx 8 seconds.

The program uses the following expressions:

The user enters a 'filesize', then

filesize x 8 = transmission_size

transmission_size / 34000 = slow_download_time_in_secs.

transmission_size / 45000 = fast_download_time_in_secs.

Example:

50,000 x 8 = 400,000

400,00 / 34,000 = 11.76

400,00 / 45,000 = 8.88

Status: Further development of this project has ceased.

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Web page (HTML) Boilerplate

In order to generate many web pages with a similar layout where only the content is different, most users would probably create a template file in a WYSIWYG web page editor such as Dreamweaver. But in the early days of the internet you had to write the utility yourself. This was DaBBS's (the early predecessor of Da2c) solution.

Status: Further development of this project has ceased.

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Tutor Menu Help

A stand-alone app that could be added to any of Da2c's video training disc's and would provide all of the documentation in the form of external HTML/CSS files. Da2c's discs now provide help pages as a mix of online and local (on disc) HTML/CSS files.

Status: Further development of this project has ceased.

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SysInfo

Providing a basic hardware audit of a user's machine that can be emailed back to Da2c. The source code for SysInfo is now incorporated in 'Help Desk - Tech Support' and other Da2c applications.

Status: Further development of this project has ceased.

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EDnA

A large part of Da2c's work is evaluating software, both freeware and commercial, for accessibility issues. EDnA partially automated the documentation process. Project EDnA (Evaluation and Documentation of new Apps) was the first practical application of the code from the 'Web page (HTML) Boilerplate' project.

Status: Further development of this project has ceased.

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CamPlay CLA

A test bed/simulator for the TechSmith's CamPlayer command line arguments. This app has now been integrated in to other Da2c apps.

Status: This project now forms a module in other Da2c apps.

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FrEMen (Front-End Menu)

A simple menu system presented to the user as soon as they inserted the CD. The app included system evaluation and audio-system setup utilities and was mainly used to access videos on CD. If the end user needed to contact Da2c, they could start up there own email client from FrEMen and the Recipient, Subject and Body text were automatically entered.

Status: This project now forms a module in other Da2c apps.

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