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REVIEWS - Duncan 'solo' & the DMcF Band
All our 'live performance' reviews are here - a lot of reading! - please use the scroll bar for navigation - cheers!


Reviews of our CDs are on the CD page
(attached to each individual CD)  - though we must say here....


Our 'All Rogues & Villains' album makes top reviewer Colin Randall's Top Ten Albums of 2007!!!

We are proud to be included in his list at ...
.http://www.salutlive.com/2007/12/promises-made-a.html#more  
his actual review at....http://www.salutlive.com/2007/12/the-duncan-mcfa.html 

Colin Randall spent nearly 28 years working for the Telegraph and is an admired critic and reviewer. He has just posted his verdict on the McFs splendid album: Congratulations Duncan. To get a verdict like that from Colin Randall is high praise indeed. Robert Peel – Longdogs Forum

We also made it into the ‘top ten album of the year’ listings at rootsmusic.co.uk

 Some snippets from the reviews of 'All Rogues & Villains' (see full reviews on the CD page)

Powerful, dynamic, engaging and exciting. Strong guitar, good vocals and a tight, driving band.
Excellent selection of songs, too. I will certainly be recommending it to all our listeners.
- FolkCast.com

 A definitive piece of English folk rock, the band deliver a finely crafted performance mixing traditional songs, incisive lyrics and talented musicianship. These are traditional songs given the DMcF treatment - roaring guitar riffs, magnificent melodeon breaks and sniping fiddle, with solid drum and bass to power through the songs. This is what English folk-rock deserves to be, combining a keen understanding of tradition welded to cutting-edge rock The depth of tradition driven by modern folk rock treatments. A masterpiece of the genre – Folkwords.com 

The sort of timeless English folk-rock that’s all too rare these days, a rocking collection of traditional and original songs with a very English feel – Dirty Linen, USA 

Also.....some snippets from various reviews of our 'Woodshed Boys' CD (see full reviews on the CD page).....
Dirty Linen - The USA’s magazine of folk and world music (#113, August/September ’04)
fRoots magazine, June 04 issue and from Shreds & Patches (Issue 31) Folk Arts Magazine for in & around Shropshire
The best snippets from all three . .
. . . . .

The world can always use more good English folk-rock and this is loud, fast music, based on the rhythms of
English country dance music with sharp-edged electric guitar leads, electric fiddle, and gutsy, gritty singing.
The power chords in the traditional nautical tale ‘Bring ‘Em Down’ crash like surf on rocks
There’s a strong rocking arrangement of Nic Jones’ version of ‘Canadee-i-o’, plus potent instrumental sets
like the ‘Twohey Step’ with duelling electric guitar and fiddle as leads.

What we have here is essentially what used to be called folk-rock with a distinctive English feel to it..........
There’s no distribution agreement as yet (which is a bit surprising)..................
..........the band hangs together like clockwork.....................

Essentially this is solid, energetic English electric folk, full of pumping riffs and loads of energy

Never mind ‘’Celtic Rock’’, here’s what the mostly English can do

It’s nice to find a folk-rock band that understands both folk AND rock and knows how to draw on one without diluting the other

Full-throated folk rock with as much attack as the Charge of the Light Brigade. Could have done with a bit
less throttle at times, but at least McFarlane and crew are eager and put some determination into proceedings.
A loud party animal and totally unashamed.

We think that's fair comment - come see us live! - scroll down for our 'live' performance reviews........

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DUNCAN's 'solo' live performance reviews.....

Living Tradition - Duncan McFarlane at the Black Swan Folk Club, York
Singer/guitarist/songwriter extraordinaire Duncan has been steadily making a name for himself over the past few years, increasingly well outwith the confines of his home county of West Yorkshire. Whether performing solo or in "acoustic band" format, his live sets invariably go down a storm, while his full-blown electric band has been hailed (and justifiably so in my book) as bringing the credibility back to that hoary old beast folk-rock.
Duncan has an obvious feel for the tradition and a deep-rooted belief that it has a place in the current folk scene, aspects which he puts across with lively showmanship. His own songs show a canny grasp of, and response to, the tradition, while his intrinsic seriousness of intent and approach is often laced with a healthy irreverence that happens to be hugely entertaining. And this latest folk club gig showed him developing his craft even further into a fine art, creating and building a great rapport with the audience from the word go - and maintaining it wholly naturally throughout two well-paced and good-sized sets.
This was another "first" for Duncan, in that on this occasion he was accompanied by just two members of his trusty "band" playing acoustically: fiddler Anne Brivonese and cittern/guitar player Geoff Taylor. To the already full sound of Duncan's own tremendous guitar playing, Anne contributed some excellent, sympathetic yet punchy bow-stroking and some lovely supporting harmony vocals, while the elfin Geoff (leaving his electric axe at home for the evening) provided some extraordinarily subtle and interesting (often quite experimental) shadings to enhance Duncan's vocals and guitar.
The set-lists contained plenty of confirmed hits from Duncan's solo repertoire (Turn The Bones Around, Bed Of Straw, Floating B) as well as a handful of newer songs (Strange Old Days Of England, Butterside Down and his brilliant contemporary take on the folk ballad Not PC) and a sprinkling of his enterprising and distinctly accessible treatments of traditional songs (John Barleycorn, Three Gypsies). These were interspersed with sensibly scaled-down renditions of good-time band-set favourites (Can't Go There, Woodshed Boys, and the rollicking encore Robin Hood's Bay).
So what if there were ramshackle moments and not everything was note-perfect - it was Fun (though some say I shouldn't use that word in connection with a folk club!), everyone had a great time, and it turned out to be one of the best recent club nights at the Swan in terms of atmosphere alone; three darned fine musicians having a great time, and carrying the punters right along with them. If you've never seen Duncan, do make the effort soon - he's one of the most genuinely entertaining performers on the folk circuit at the moment, and what's more, his original songs are worth getting to know too!
'The Living Tradition' magazine, June 06


Tykes News DUNCAN McFARLANE - BLACK SWAN FOLK CLUB, YORK, 16TH MARCH 2006
Good ol' Dunc - this latest folk club gig, less than a week after surviving a traumatic car accident,
found him in fine fettle, up and about, still developing his craft and showmanship, creating and building a great rapport
with the audience from the word go - and maintaining it wholly naturally throughout two well-paced and good-sized sets.
It was another "first" for Duncan, in that on this occasion he was accompanied by just two members of his trusty "band"
playing acoustically: fiddler Anne Brivonese and cittern/guitar player Geoff Taylor.
To the already full sound of Duncan's own tremendous guitar playing, Anne contributed some excellent, sympathetic yet punchy bow-stroking and some lovely supporting harmony vocals, while the elfin Geoff (leaving the electric axe at home for the evening) provided some extraordinarily subtle and interesting (often quite experimental) shadings to enhance Duncan's vocals and guitar. The set-lists contained plenty of confirmed hits from Duncan's solo repertoire (Turn The Bones Around,
Bed Of Straw, Floating B) as well as a handful of newer songs (Strange Old Days Of England, Butterside Down and Not PC) and a sprinkling of his enterprising and distinctly accessible treatments of traditional songs (John Barleycorn, Three Gypsies). These were interspersed with sensibly scaled-down renditions of good-time band-set favourites (Can't Go There, Woodshed Boys and the rollicking encore Robin Hood's Bay). So what if not everything was note-perfect - it was Fun (at a folk club?!
- tut tut!), and it turned out one of the best recent club nights at the Swan in terms of atmosphere alone.
Duncan really is one of the most genuinely entertaining performers on the circuit at the moment.


Programme Notes, OTLEY FESTIVAL 03
Duncan is one of Otley's local stars, of whom we're justifiably proud. When he isn't with his band, he can be found performing solo. He is a brilliant guitarist, playing a steel-strung guitar finger-style predominantly in C modal tuning, which is why you may detect echoes of one of his heroes - Nic Jones, Duncan's own songs are lyrical, thought-provoking, often humorous, always entertaining; he also turns his considerable skills to traditional material and contemporary classics.

CLECKHEATON FOLK FESTIVAL - 5th to 7th JULY '02
Cleckheaton's a lovely little festival . . . . 2002's festival encompassed the wide range of activities you'd expect from any festival . . . guest roster . . .mixture of headline acts . . . Tanglefoot, Mundy-Turner, Colum Sands, Seize The Day, . . . . . . . . . And local lad Duncan McFarlane, whose Bed Of Straw album made such a favourable impression on the nation's critics - a crack guitarist, idiomatic singer, and not least a writer of excellent songs mostly in a traditional idiom, Duncan's gaining quite a reputation on the festival circuit, so look out for him!
Extracts taken from the festival's own website - EVERY word is there regarding Duncan - nowt left owt!

From 'Stirrings' Magazine's review of OTLEY FOLK FESTIVAL 02
 . . . And Leeds legend Duncan McFarlane was on the best form I've seen to date (and his gigs are always pretty damned good!), despite a gruelling weekend schedule and the onset of the 'flu' bug. His Friday night gig at The Grove Hill Club with those other local heroes Slide and the irrepressible Hall Brothers was one of the best of the entire festival – superb atmosphere, great music, good fun.


Folk at the Grove, Leeds - Review of Duncan solo - 2nd February '01
Duncan McFarlane, Duncan who? No not Duncan Goodhew, but Duncan McFarlane. 
Never heard of him! Judging by the number of people who were packed in 
the Grove Folk Club before 8.30 that night, lots of people had.
Why did they turn up? Well, this guy is worth seeing and does some pretty 
natty stuff like "The Devil and the Feathery Wife". Doesn't chat too much 
in between songs either, and some songs you can join in with.
He also did some self-penned things, one of which was "Bed of Straw", 
coincidentally to be the title track of his forthcoming CD. 
This I'm sure will feature his masterly exploits on guitar.
The audience would have liked the evening to go on and on, with such notable 
floor spots as Whitney Gin and Mark Longster. Throwing-out time came too 
soon as the bar called a halt to the proceedings, but not before Duncan had 
treated us from folk-trads to self-penned songs right through to "Day Dream Believer".
An unbelievable, super night at the Grove. Well done Duncan!.
If you're lucky enough to catch Duncan, you won't be disappointed. ... 
Sometimes the written word is not enough. Sometimes you have to be there.!
Rod Calvert - Tykes News  
            
OTLEY FOLK FESTIVAL - Red Lion Concert - Saturday 20th September '01
I had seen Duncan at various places round our local folk clubs doing floor spots, and singing in sing-arounds,
and had been very impressed with his songs and guitar work, so I was happy to have the opportunity to see him 
performing a full "set" in concert.
Duncan is an accomplished performer, so accomplished in fact, that when I first came across him,
I wondered where he had come from. I was amazed to find he was quite new to solo performance,
although clearly his background in rock music has stood him in good stead.
Duncan treated us to an excellent set, ideally suited to a festival audience, with plenty of "joining-in" stuff,
both traditional and from his own and other people's pens. Duncan is not one of your introspective navel gazing 
singer-songwriters, and in this set he treated us to "Bed of Straw" - the title track of his new CD,
and "The Famous Floating 'B'" .. both of which are so jaunty and infectious they run the risk of becoming instantly "trad".
Notably of other writers' material Duncan gave us "Anderson's Coast (by John Warner)"
.. which wins my personal "song of the festival" award, and Dougie MacLean's "Talking With My Father" with a guitar accompaniment which wouldn't have disgraced the master himself.
And as if this wasn't enough we also got "The Devil and the Feathery Wife" for laughs, and "Begging Song"
and "Boys of Bedlam" for a storming finish. Did the audience enjoy it? They loved it. Did I enjoy it? I did. 
Did I buy the CD? Yup!
Tykes News

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The DMcF Band (electric) . . . . .'live'. . . . . .

Ilkley Gazette - Thursday 27th September 2007 Otley Folk Festival 2007
Beer runs out but the music doesn't -
By Judith Dunn

Sunday afternoon and there was plenty of energy when the Duncan McFarlane Electric Band blasted into action with
tracks from the new album. This was their third festival appearance, each with different material which is typical of their professionalism. Their professionalism combined with talent and sheer enjoyment made this the high point.
The cricket club rocked as the crowd joined in enthusiastically. The band played for close on two hours and the bar
ran out of Black Sheep well before they ran out of steam. The album was well and truly launched.

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Rounds Festival 04: write-up from Northants local press
What an incredibly exhausting weekend it's been……….etc
Starting on Friday night with a Celidh ………..etc…………… Saturday night was a totally different experience.
Doughboy Zydecaun kicked off the night in style, followed by the incredibly talented Magic Carr
(had to get a copy of their CD "Yellow Main Sequence") and then, well.................
The whole place rocked and reeled to the music and energy that is The Duncan McFarlane Band. 
If you haven't heard this band, get to a gig soon! They were fantastic - great musicians, vocals and such style! 
I want to know... how can Duncan McFarlane still have enough energy to leap all over the place after 11 at night,
following a curry and having played for over an hour?
The band's temporary drummer was not only very pleasing to the eye, but simply superb! 
Some of their die-hard fans came along with them all the way from up't'north, and yet another cd was added to my collection.
(I have a copy of their gig list if anyone's interested - they are playing soon in Southend and Cleckheaton and Otley and um.. can't remember the rest) . Well worth a look though!
Another 2am crawl into bed with thoughts of Sunday in my head and the strains of "Woodshed Boys" still whirling in my ears.
Jenny Clarke - Festival Organiser

The Duncan McFarlane Band – Live review The New Roscoe – Monday 20th January 2003

Hmm…. the New Roscoe you say? Isn’t that where the tribute bands play? Well yes I suppose it is, but periodically they offer a night over to a group of performers who can really write songs and play them without pretending to be someone else. So whilst previous ‘Roscoe’ bands are worrying about whether their wig looks authentic Bon Jovi mullet or whether the pink spandex pants are ‘Iron Maiden’ enough, the pre-gig Duncan McFarlane band are relaxing and chatting and getting to know their audience prior to flooring them with a knock out show.
This six-piece folk rock band were formed for a one off gig in Otley during one of the folk festivals and proceeded to take the place by storm. Mr McFarlane himself a highly accomplished singer/songwriter/guitarist with a long history of music in the Leeds area, has now been establishing himself as a folk artist with an infectious degree of enthusiasm for his subject material. Taking the stage he was accompanied by a competent and obviously talented team, Geoff Taylor (an old band mate from the 70’s rock era) on lead guitar, Anne Brivonese on electric violin/vox, Tony Rogerson and Nick Pepper –Bass & Drums. The one person missing was Steve Fairholme –Melodeon and squeezy things – on his holidays.
The set was made up of originals and traditional material, all arranged to reflect the strengths of the band. Songs like ‘Can’t Go There’ a McFarlane song about showing yourself up whilst drunk and never being able to return to the scene of the crime (If that’s the case then Shane McGowan must be housebound!), sit alongside songs like ‘Benjamin Bowmaneer’ a traditional piece rocked up.  With lots of imaginative intros and arrangements, this band were tight!  Duncan’s acoustic guitar playing provided the platform for the band to drive the rhythms and melodies along, his inspired use of mainly C modal tuning adding an extra dimension to the tunes whilst echoing Martin Carthy’s technique and dynamic.
Duncan himself appears to find inspiration in the oddest of tales…hence ‘Bed of Straw’ a story of two men hounded by a press gang in Leeds many years ago. This ability to make stories visual through song is the very essence of folk music and Duncan does this without pretence or cliché, recording past events with the narrative of an innocent bystander at the time.
The band kept their energy right to the end of the set. With great harmonies, and even better playing, this is a band hopefully destined for a wider audience on the festival circuit. Hmm…With that in mind it would be wise to catch them now, or you could wait till the tribute band forms!
Andy Aitchison

DMcFband (electric) at Otley Festival Sept '03 - from the Wharfedale Gazette
The Folk Festival began shyly on Thursday evening, and after its full launch in lifeboat conditions on that heartless wet Friday, picked up speed through Saturday.  It delivered at numerous venues and arrived in triumph at the Civic Centre Main Hall for the Sunday night concert with master of ceremonies Jim Lawton in charge.
The opening act was the electric and electrifying version of the Duncan McFarlane Band.  Singer/writer/guitarist Duncan and his musicians have become such a central feature at Otley Festivals that if the time comes when they can’t be there, even their absence will be given special billing. The hall was as crammed as regulations allow and the audience as intense as the music, which is potent without being overwhelming.
The band is a 6-piece with Geoff Taylor’s lead guitar and Anne Brivonese's violin rolling out a carpet of sound over which
the action ceaselessly capers. It’s a finely balanced outfit which could clearly hold its own in a venue ten times the size
of this 300-seater, but was in no way too much for its surroundings.
John Hepworth

The DMcFband (electric) at the Junction Inn, Otley, Tues 16th July '03

Guitarist, singer, songwriter Duncan is based in Leeds, but has been making a name for himself recently with his first CD,
Bed Of Straw, which garnered deservedly excellent reviews, notably in fRoots and TMM.
Contrary to what you might expect, here is no expat Scot with a dour line in interminable tartan’n’haggis balladry,
but a damned fine, ultra-energetic guitarist who has clearly learnt a lot from Messrs Carthy and N. Jones but has developed
his own vital take on traditional song, mostly English in origin, while honing his own pretty classy songwriting talent both
within the idiom and in more contemporary stylings.
Indeed, that very song Bed Of Straw, based around a Leeds legend, came a too-close-for-comfort runner-up in the Songwriting Competition at last year’s Saltburn Festival, and the album has gained a fair amount of airplay on folk radio. That album was recorded very much “live in the studio”, just Duncan and his guitar with virtually no overdubs, and conveys extremely well Duncan’s fiery and forceful musical personality.     More recently, however, Duncan has begun experimenting with an expanded lineup, a six-piece electric band, to play folk-rock for fun. Heard the phrase “rockin’ the English tradition”? Well, Duncan’s band does all that and more!
A selected few local gigs with a minimum of rehearsal had proved astoundingly successful, completely against Duncan’s expectations, and the leap of faith was duly taken to arrange more, of which this July fixture, on defiantly home ground at that well-loved venue, was the first. It was evident that there had been a certain amount of more serious rehearsal this time round, with a distinctly improved tightness in arrangements and execution, but the sense of everyone enjoying themselves immensely was still there right from the outset.
Instrumentally, Duncan confined himself to the pivotal role, striding abreast his amplified acoustic rhythm guitar, providing as much a fulcrum as a figurehead/focus for the band, which sports at least two star instrumentalists with quite different playing styles. Electric fiddler (and sometime vocalist) Anne Brivonese contributed some supremely exciting playing without needing to act the show-off, while amazing lead guitarist Geoff Taylor (what a find!) stayed the right side of showy throughout with his dazzling and inspired (heavy-Mike-Oldfield-style) solo work.
Melodeon supremo Steve Fairholme (of Otley Folk Festival fame) did sterling battle with the assembled forces and even managed (despite certain problems with the sound balance – well, you can’t have everything straightaway!) to make himself rise above the group texture on occasions to demonstrate just how sensible and solid a supporting player he is in this kind of context.
The rhythm section – bassist Tony Rogerson and new drummer Nick Pepper – made all the correct noises and stuck together admirably, yet brought a frisson to their bedrock that ensured the group couldn’t be accused of meretricious plodding by the folk police!
The two sets mixed Duncan’s own material with well rocked-up versions of traditional stuff that wouldn’t disgrace a Fairport or LJE or even a Blue Horses. The more successful of the latter – Canadee-I-O and Jug Of This – look set to be regarded as classic arrangements in the folk-rock world, while even the more Steeleye-derivative items (Cold Haily Windy Night and Boys Of Bedlam) had much to commend them in the gig context, no mere crowd-pleasers. The latter tag could apply to one or two of the instrumental sets perhaps, but there’s no shame in that provided they’re done well, as here, and Duncan’s own tunes (notably the Anna Morrison/Karine set) are already becoming firm favourites.
The gig also showcased a high proportion of Duncan’s own excellent songs, naturally including some of his catchiest numbers (Bed Of Straw and the newer Can’t Go There), interspersed with some well-chosen and unusually enterprising covers (Richard Thompson’s I Misunderstood, Vin Garbutt’s Danny Daniells, Dougie Maclean’s Mairi Bahn, the Levellers’ Fifteen Years and Beautiful Day).
The whole gig was a knockout, minor warts and sonic difficulties and all, with a really great atmosphere. Do get to see Duncan’s band if you’re ever in his neck of the woods, but if not it’s well worth catching him solo when he gets to venture further afield, as he’s really a force to be reckoned with I say.
He’s got plenty that's original to say, and a highly captivating performing style with which to say it.
David Kidman

The DMcFband (electric) – Live review The New Roscoe – Monday 20th January 2003

Hmm…. the New Roscoe you say? Isn’t that where the tribute bands play?
Well yes I suppose it is, but periodically they offer a night over to a group of performers who can really write songs and play them without pretending to be someone else. So whilst previous ‘Roscoe’ bands are worrying about whether their wig looks authentic Bon Jovi mullet or whether the pink spandex pants are ‘Iron Maiden’ enough, the pre-gig Duncan McFarlane band are relaxing and chatting and getting to know their audience prior to flooring them with a knock out show.
This six-piece folk rock band were formed for a one off gig in Otley during one of the folk festivals and proceeded to take the place by storm. Mr McFarlane himself a highly accomplished singer/songwriter/guitarist with a long history of music in the Leeds area, has now been establishing himself as a folk artist with an infectious degree of enthusiasm for his subject material. Taking the stage he was accompanied by a competent and obviously talented team, Geoff Taylor (an old band mate from the 70’s rock era) on lead guitar, Anne Brivonese on electric violin/vox, Tony Rogerson and Nick Pepper –Bass & Drums. The one person missing was Steve Fairholme –Melodeon and squeezy things – on his holidays.
The set was made up of originals and traditional material, all arranged to reflect the strengths of the band. Songs like ‘Can’t Go There’ a McFarlane song about showing yourself up whilst drunk and never being able to return to the scene of the crime (If that’s the case then Shane McGowan must be housebound!), sit alongside songs like ‘Benjamin Bowmaneer’ a traditional piece rocked up.  With lots of imaginative intros and arrangements, this band were tight!  Duncan’s acoustic guitar playing provided the platform for the band to drive the rhythms and melodies along, his inspired use of mainly C modal tuning adding an extra dimension to the tunes whilst echoing Martin Carthy’s technique and dynamic.
Duncan himself appears to find inspiration in the oddest of tales…hence ‘Bed of Straw’ a story of two men
hounded by a press gang in Leeds many years ago.
This ability to make stories visual through song is the very essence of folk music and Duncan does this without
pretence or cliché, recording past events with the narrative of an innocent bystander at the time.
The band kept their energy right to the end of the set. With great harmonies, and even better playing,
this is a band hopefully destined for a wider audience on the festival circuit.
Hmm…With that in mind it would be wise to catch them now, or you could wait till the tribute band forms!
Andy Aitchison

The DMcFband (electric) – Live at the Wheatley Hotel, Ilkley 30th March '02 - From Tykes News, Summer '02 edition
 I am the Assistant General Manager and Entertainment Manager/Events Coordinator at The Wheatley Hotel in Ben Rhydding, Ilkley.  I have recently initiated a live-music and entertainment schedule and would like to tell you about one of the bands that recently performed here on Saturday the 30th of March… The Duncan McFarlane Band. 
 I have listened to a lot of bands in my time, having been the Landlord of the now closed Duchess of York in the city center of Leeds.  In a word, The Duncan McFarlane Band is… awesome! 
Some of the finest folk/rock I have ever heard.  The band consists of on fiddle & vocals - Anne Brivonese;
drums - Nick Pepper; bass guitar - Tony Rogerson; electric guitar - Geoff Taylor;
and on electric guitar & acoustic guitars, vocals, traditional arrangements, original tunes & song writing,
conductor, musical director and just about anything else he can get his hands on! – Duncan McFarlane. 
 They performed traditional material as well as their own originals. 
 We were busy that night.  I was even bringing extra tables from the main pub into our function room, The Bull Room,
where they were playing in order to accommodate people.  Some of the songs they played through the night were:
Twohey Step – an original Duncan McFarlane tune… Jug of This – great traditional tune…Cold, Haily, Windy Night
– another traditional tune... Dee Jig - a fast original instrumental… I Misunderstood… a Richard Thompson tune. 
At the end of the show, there was a request for a Levellers tune (What a Beautiful Day). They played it and the individual
who requested the song was so overwhelmed, that they allowed him to come up and sing along with them. 
 Many photos were taken and we certainly plan to frame one and put it up here at The Wheatley. 
Everyone in the room loved the atmosphere and the music. 
ALL of the band members are excellent.  Geoff is certainly one of the very best guitarists in our local area… undoubtedly one of the best guitarists in the north of England.  Great people… all of them lovely. I am having them back on Saturday, the 18th of May and looking forward to it. 
I wholeheartedly recommend The Duncan McFarlane Band to anyone who is interested in the best in Folk/Rock… and Duncan’s CD, ‘Bed of Straw’ is premier.  I hope you will find this review useful. Warm Regards,
Robin Dover - Wheatley Hotel

The DMcFband (electric) – Live at the Junction, Otley, 7 July 02

The famous folking M rocked up a storm with his excellent electric band at a packed Junction in Otley.
Blistering originals and rejuvenated traditional songs kept the pace frenetic throughout.
Tony Rogerson and Nick Pepper (bass and drums respectively) gave the band a foundation you could build
a Norman castle on, whilst Steve Fairholme’s melodeon added splashes of subtlety and colour.
Geoff Taylor’s splendid, defiantly ‘70s lead guitar kept the decibel level way above a roar, but the eye in the middle
of this particular electric storm was Anne Brivonese. Standing serene at the centre of proceedings and adding elegant
and exciting fiddle riffs to such standards as ‘Canadee-I-O’ and ‘Jug of This’, as well as lead vocals for ‘Lowlands of Holland’, she is a real star.
What of the man himself? Well, Dunx was in fine form. His voice is just as suited to rock as it is to folk, and his guitar playing is brisk and energetic, but it’s his songs which lift this band from being merely very good to being exceptional.
New songs like ‘Rawfolds Mill’ and the one about just how many feet you can put in your mouth, were rapturously received. Throw in some well-chosen covers (Richard Thompson, Levellers) and you have just about the best folk-rock band on the circuit.
Wayne Stote - Tykes News

From Tykes News, The DMcFband (electric) at OTLEY Folk Festival '02
 . . . Other highlights across the weekend included Last Night's Fun . . . and the Duncan McFarlane Band, who played for over two hours without a break, to a packed house in Kork's on Saturday night. I've waxed lyrical about this band previously but suffice to say, by the end of the night, I was hoarse, almost deaf and had blisters on my hands. Typical Dunx gig! 
Wayne Stote

The DMcFband (acoustic) - 'Live' at the Three Horseshoes, Otley, 13th Aug '03 -  (A gig which was recorded for a 'live' CD)
 Duncan McFarlane, with or without band, is no stranger to the Otley Folk scene.
 What made last Wednesday's Folk Night at the Three Horseshoes extra special is that it featured
a four-piece acoustic line-up - and out of it will come a new 'live' CD.
 As usual, the upstairs room was full and the audience joined in heartily. Difficult not to - fresh from Holmfirth,
Saddleworth and Cambridge Festivals, Duncan diplayed his usual infectious enthusiasm for his material.
He claimed to be nervous, but his abililty to carry a song was as powerful as ever.
The band was on form too - Anne Brivonese on fiddle and vocals, Geoff Taylor on acoustic guitar
and Steve Fairholme on melodeon and vocals.
Duncan has a happy knack of giving generous credit to everyone,
even starting a song over to give due attention to Steve's bass harmonising.
The two sets included eight of Duncan's own songs and the CD is something worth looking forward to.