North York Moors CAM

Wednesday 2nd February 2000

Around Danby and Danby Beacon

 

Lockwood Beck

Lockwood Beck Reservoir

 

Freebrough Hill

Freebrough Hill on Moorsolm Moor - rising to 821 feet, it is of entirely natural geological formation,
an Oolitic cap left behind whilst glaciers eroded the surrounding softer rocks

 

Commondale & Kildale Moor

Looking west from Three Howes Rigg towards Commondale & Kildale Moor

 

Danby from Ainthorpe

looking north to Danby village from Ainthorpe

 

Duck Bridge

Duck Bridge, near Danby Castle - spanning the River Esk, it bears the arms of the Nevilles who succeeded to Danby in 1380.
The original was probably medieval but was restored by Mr George Duck of Danby, c. 1717, hence the present name

 

Duck Bridge

More views of Duck Bridge . . .

 

Duck Bridge

. . . . note the depth gauge next to the present 'bridge' - the Esk can soon rise rapidly after heavy rain.
I'm willing to bet the old bridge will still be standing long after the modern version has been washed away

 

Danby Beacon

Danby Beacon - one of a series that were erected across the country to warn of invaders

 

viewpoint indicator

This viewpoint indicator stands about 50 yards east of the Beacon and enjoys the same extensive panorama
- here we are looking north towards Scaling Dam reservoir and, just on the horizon, we can see glimpses of the North Sea

 

site of radar station

Lying about 500 yards west of Danby Beacon are a few remains of the the site of a World War 2 Radar Station - the plaque reads
"THE MOUND BEHIND THIS MARKER HOUSED THE EQUIPMENT WHICH DETECTED AND LED TO THE SHOOTING DOWN
BY FLT. LIEUT. PETER TOWNSEND OF THE FIRST ENEMY AIRCRAFT TO FALL ON ENGLAND - 3RD FEBRUARY 1940"

see illustrations and maps of what Danby Beacon Radar Station looked like in 1942

or read the story of the shooting down of the first enemy plane on English soil during World War II

 

fly-past

Seconds after reading the plaque I turned and witnessed, as if in tribute, this 'fly-past'

 

tumulus

This 'tumulus' , grazed by sheep and typical of many on the North York Moors, is the site of an ancient burial ground
- most have been excavated and, as well as skeletal remains, weapons and personal belongings
to those who perished have been found in the graves

 


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