Books by David M. Harland


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Apollo 12 - On the Ocean of Storms

David M. Harland

530 pages

Springer-Praxis
March 2011

ISBN-10: 144197606X
ISBN-13: 978-1441976062

In July 1969 Apollo 11 successfully achieved the first manned lunar landing. A few months later Pete Conrad, Dick Gordon and Al Bean set off to attempt an even more challenging mission. Free of the 'burden of history', these three close friends were determined to have fun. This is the story of their mission. Apollo 12 dramatically showed how conservative Apollo 11 had been. Of course, the rationale for selecting a bland target for the first landing was fully justified, but just imagine if Neil Armstrong had set Eagle down amongst a cluster of craters and he and Buzz Aldrin had walked over to an earlier unmanned lander and snipped off its camera! With its 31.5 hours on the lunar surface, double moonwalk, deployment of geophysical instruments and geological traverse, Apollo 12 undertook what many people had hoped would be attempted by the first landing crew. It set the scene for a program of scientific lunar exploration.
Apollo 12 - On the Ocean of Storms supplements my earlier The First Men on the Moon - The story of Apollo 11 in a series of books devoted to the lunar missions.

Paving the Way for Apollo 11

David M. Harland

400 pages

Springer-Praxis
Spring 2009

ISBN-10: 0387681310
ISBN-13: 978-0387681313

This book explains the lure of the Moon to - in turn - classical philosophers, astronomers and geologists, and how NASA set out to investigate the Moon in preparation for a manned lunar landing mission. It focuses particularly on the Lunar Orbiter and Surveyor missions.

Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 2: Hiatus and Revewal 1983-1996

Paolo Ulivi with David M. Harland

550 pages

Springer-Praxis
October 2008

ISBN-10: 0387789049
ISBN-13: 978-0387789040

This is a comprehensive account of the design and management of deep-space missions, the spacecraft involved - some flown, others not - their instruments, and their scientific results. It details planetary missions of the 1980s up to the Soviet Phobos mission; the flybys of Halley's comet; the 'flagship' missions of the 1990s, including Magellan, Galileo and Mars Observer; and planetary missions from the early 1990s up to 1996, including Ulysses, Clementine, NEAR, Mars Pathfinder, Mars Global Surveyor, Mars-96 and early proposals for a small Pluto probe.
The story will continue in future volumes in this series.

Exploring the Moon - The Apollo Expeditions
Second Edition

David M. Harland

400 pages

Springer-Praxis
January 2008

ISBN-10: 0387746382
ISBN-13: 978-0387746388

This is a large format version of my 1999 book of the same title, fully reillustrated with panoramas made from high-resolution scans by NASA of the original Hasselblad film.

Nominated for a 2008 Sir Arthur C. Clarke Award.

Space Exploration 2008

David M. Harland and Brian Harvey

182 pages

Springer-Praxis
September 2007

ISBN-10: 038771667X
ISBN-13: 978-0387716671

Space Exploration is aimed at a 'general science' readership and provides an update on space launches, missions and results. It looks back at past missions, reviews those currently under way, and details those planned for the future. It features invited contributions from leading figures in space exploration.

Robotic Exploration of the Solar System, Part 1: The Golden Age 1957-1982

Paolo Ulivi with David M. Harland

600 pages

Springer-Praxis
August 2007

ISBN-10: 0387493263
ISBN-13: 978-0387493268

This is a comprehensive account of the design and management of deep-space missions, the spacecraft involved - some flown, others not - their instruments, and their scientific results. It starts with a review of the state of knowledge of the solar system at the dawn of the 'space age'. It then relates: the initial attempts to fly missions to Venus and Mars; the missions to explore all the planets of the inner solar system - notably the Veneras that landed on Venus, the Vikings that landed on Mars and Mariner 10, which made three flybys of Mercury; the Pioneers that were first to Jupiter and Saturn; and concludes with the Voyagers that undertook a comprehensive reconnaissance of the outer solar system and went on to become the first probes to venture into interstellar space.
The story will be brought up to date in future volumes in this series.

Cassini at Saturn - Huygens Results

David M. Harland

400 pages

Springer-Praxis
February 2007

ISBN: 0-387-26129-X

The Cassini spacecraft entered orbit around Saturn on 1 July 2004. Several months later it released the Huygens probe, which, on 14 January 2005, parachuted through the clouds of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, and successfully landed on its surface. This book covers this audacious mission, and reviews the first two years of scientific data from Cassini's tour of the Saturnian system during which it had revealed astonishing insights into some of the the other moons, such as Enceladus, which has geysers of water at its south pole, and Iapetus, one hemisphere of which is stained black.
Note that this book is an updated form of my earlier book 'Mission to Saturn'.

The First Men On The Moon - The Story of Apollo 11

David M. Harland

380 pages

Springer-Praxis
October 2006

ISBN: 0-387-34176-5

On 12 April 1961 Yuri Gagarin became the first man to orbit the Earth. One month later, President John F. Kennedy challenged the American nation to land a man on the Moon before the decade was out. On 16 July 1969, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin set off in Apollo 11 to attempt this audacious mission, and succeeded magnificently. This book tells the story of Apollo 11, starting with crew selection and training, the choice of the landing site, and the assembly of the space vehicle, then a detailed account of the mission, featuring the lunar landing and moonwalk, and a review of how our knowledge of the Moon's history was revolutionised as a result. The story is enlivened by dialogue between the astronauts in space and the flight controllers in Mission Control, and is richly illustrated with the pictures taken at the time.

Apollo - The Definitive Sourcebook

Richard W. Orloff and David M. Harland

633 pages

Springer-Praxis
March 2006

ISBN: 0-387-30043-0

On 25 May 1961, John F Kennedy challenged his nation to land a man on the Moon by the end of the decade. NASA decided that a specialised vehicle would make the landing, while the main Apollo spacecraft remained in lunar orbit. To send these vehicles to the Moon would require the development of an enormous rocket. In December 1968 Apollo 8 was launched on a pioneering mission to perform an initial reconnaissance in lunar orbit. In July 1969 Apollo 11 achieved the program's political objective. When Apollo 17 lifted off from the Moon in December 1972, the program was concluded. Now - at long last - there is a real prospect of a resumption of human exploration of the Moon. This book provides an overview of the origins of the Apollo program and a detailed account of its execution, complete with statistical data, to serve as a single-volume 'sourcebook'.

Chinese translation in progress.

Revised pages for 2006 reprint
Please continue to report bugs, which will be fixed in the next reprint.

Water and the Search for Life on Mars

David M. Harland

260 pages

Springer-Praxis
October 2005

ISBN: 0-387-26020-X

A century ago, Percival Lowell enthralled the world with his vision of Mars as home to a dying civilisation that had excavated a network of canals to direct water from the polar caps to warmer latitudes, but by the start of the Space Age this view had been dismissed as fantasy. The best that could be hoped for was a hardy form of lichen. In 1965 the first flyby space probe took pictures that showed an ancient cratered world having a cold and arid surface that was geologically inert. But in 1971 a spacecraft placed into orbit around Mars showed ancient river valleys and flood plains indicating that water once flowed on the surface. In the 1970s two Viking landers were sent to test for life in the soil, but the results were at best ambiguous, and widely regarded as negative. But hopes were raised by the discovery of 'extremophile' microbes on Earth that the Vikings would not have been able to detect. As water is the key to life, it was decided to 'follow the water', and in 2004 the two Mars Exploration Rovers 'Spirit' and 'Opportunity' were landed to seek evidence in the rocks that there had once been liquid water on the surface... with positive results. One site seems once to have been on the shore of an ocean, and would certainly have been conducive to microscopic life. Was life once present? Might it still exist? This book reviews the search for evidence of water and life on Mars.

Space Systems Failures - Disasters and Rescues of Satellites, Rockets and Space Probes

David M. Harland and Ralph D. Lorenz

360 pages

Springer-Praxis
May 2005

ISBN: 0-387-21519-0

Few endeavours are as technologically demanding as the design and operation of rockets and robotic spacecraft. Throughout the Space Age, missions have been frustrated by a variety of failures, ranging from booster failures and upper stages misfiring, to satellites blowing fuses, to probes missing their targets, and even crash landing. In space, therefore, just as on Earth, if we are to advance the state of the art we must learn from our failures. This book reviews the causes of failures and how the engineering knowledge base has been enhanced by the lessons learned, and provides an insight into the trials and tribulations of exploration and exploitation of the high frontier.

Chinese translation in progress.

The Story of Space Station Mir

David M. Harland

450 pages

Springer-Praxis
October 2004

ISBN: 0-387-23011-4

Born in the Cold War, Mir's ultimate triumph is that it taught the two superpower rivals, the USSR and the USA, to cooperate in space. Mir showed how humans could live and work in space, how to overcome unforeseen problems, and survive potentially fatal situations. The wealth of experience provided by the Mir program provides the means to keep the International Space Station operational, crewed and supplied. The Story of Space Station Mir charts the development, operations and achievements of a remarkable space station, mankind's first true long-term home in space: providing a comprehensive and definitive account of Mir throughout its operational life; describing in detail some of the most dramatic, fascinating and defining events in its history; explaining its assembly, module by module, in space, and describing how it became an international research laboratory; and demonstrating why its legacy is still vitally important today.

How NASA learned to fly in space: An exciting account of the Gemini missions

David M. Harland

285 pages

Apogee Books
Autumn 2004

ISBN: 1-894959-07-8

NASA learned to fly in space in a time when the agency was young and lean, and had an explicit mandate of staggering audacity set against a tight deadline; in a time when the agency readily accepted risk, and made momentous decisions 'on the run'; in a time when a rendezvous was a major objective of a mission, in a time when opening the hatch and venturing outside was a serious challenge. Apollo claimed the glory, but it was Gemini that 'stretched the envelope' of spaceflight to make going to the Moon feasible. As Dr Robert Gilruth, director of the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, observed: "In order to go to the Moon, we had to learn how to operate in space. We had to learn how to manoeuvre with precision to rendezvous and to dock; to work outside in the hard vacuum of space; to endure long-duration in the weightless environment; and to learn how to make precise landings from orbital flight - that is where the Gemini Program came in."

The Story of the Space Shuttle

David M. Harland

450 pages

Springer-Praxis
2004

ISBN: 1-85233-793-1

The US Space Shuttle, which entered service in 1981, was conceived as a reusable spacecraft providing cheap access to low Earth orbit, and to supersede expendable launch vehicles. In spite of the Challenger and Columbia disasters, it is arguably the most successful spacecraft ever developed. The Story of the Space Shuttle explains the scientific contribution that it has made to the international space programme, focusing on the Shuttle's utility rather than its development. Each chapter is devoted to a specific type of operation, and the missions are discussed in this context. Missions to Mir, Hubble and, more recently, the Shuttle's role in the assembly of the International Space Station are described.

Lunar Exploration - Human Pioneers and Robotic Surveyors

Paolo Ulivi with David M. Harland

365 pages

Springer-Praxis
2004

ISBN: 1-85233-746-X

From the late 1950s, when the former USSR launched its Lunik probes, to the mid 1970s and the United States' successful manned flights to the Moon, lunar exploration was high on the superpowers' space agendas. After a hiatus in the 1980s, interest is once again on the increase. Perhaps a new age of lunar exploration is about to begin. Lunar Exploration: Human Pioneers and Robotic Surveyors is a lucid and accessible account of man's attempts to reach the Moon.

NASA's Voyager Missions - Exploring the Outer Solar System and Beyond

Ben Evans with David M. Harland

285 pages

Springer-Praxis
2003

ISBN: 1-85233-745-1

NASA'S VOYAGER MISSIONS tells the amazing story of the hugely successful Voyager missions launched by NASA in 1977 to unlock the secrets of the outer Solar System. Initially designed to explore Jupiter and Saturn, the Voyager spacecraft provided more information about these giant planets than could have been gathered from one thousand years of ground-based observation. But the story did not end there. Voyager 2 reached Neptune and Uranus, two worlds which are not only on the fringes of the Solar System but also of human knowledge. Now both Voyagers are drifting 10 billion km from Earth but who can tell what - or whom - they will encounter in deep outer space? This book describes not only the missions from their conception, but the men and women who have devoted their working lives to them. Each of the four planets are discussed, with the Voyagers' discoveries and observations enriched by more recent studies from other spacecraft, including Galileo, the Hubble Space Telescope and the forthcoming Cassini mission at Saturn. NASA'S VOYAGER MISSIONS is a story of one of the greatest explorations in the history of human endeavour.

The Big Bang - A view from the 21st Century

David M. Harland

265 pages

Springer-Praxis
2003

ISBN: 1-85233-7133

The Big Bang relates the development of two parallel strands of scientific thought, the inner workings of the atom and the large-scale structures in the Universe, telling how particle physicists and cosmologists are learning to work together to study the origin and evolution of the Universe. The book starts with a review of how physicists studying the subatomic realm reached the conclusion that fundamental particles are tiny vibrating strings and membranes, and that the forces of nature evolved as the Big Bang's fireball cooled. Contrary to long-held belief, the expansion rate is not slowing down, but is accelerating, suggesting that an insight that Einstein dismissed as his 'greatest blunder' might not have been so outlandish after all. David Harland explains how 'black holes' were first theorised, and then identified in multiple-star systems and, on a much larger scale, in the cores of galaxies. Might what we perceive as the Big Bang have been the view - from the inside - of the creation of a black hole in another Universe?

Buglist to chapter 3 of initial print run

Apollo EECOM: Journey of a lifetime

Sy Liebergot with David M. Harland

216 pages

Apogee Books
2003

ISBN: 1-896522-96-3

Behind every NASA space mission there were literally thousands of people involved in design, manufacture, support, management, etc. Most of these people had the opportunity to plan their work in detail and then test and refine it until it was as good as could be. Mission Control, however, was quite a different situation - in the midst of a mission there is no time for lengthy investigations, and your answers had better be right first time and every time; lives depend on it. Most of what we learn about NASA's space missions comes from statements carefully planned and massaged by managers and public relations people. With Apollo EECOM: Journey of a Lifetime we finally get an insider's view of how the Flight Controllers operated and just what they faced when events were crucial. This book is the life story of Sy Liebergot, former NASA Flight Controller, with emphasis on his years working in Mission Control. Following the disastrous tank explosion during the Apollo 13 mission, it was the Flight Controllers that made possible the safe return of the three endangered astronauts. Aboard Apollo 13, Lovell, Haise and Swigert performed wonders battling for their lives, but without the expertise, quick thinking and technical support of Mission Control, they never could have come home. Sy Liebergot was there and relates the details as they really happened. And Apollo 13 is just one of the many exciting stories he tells us. Truly and insider's view, this book discusses not just the events, but also the people that decided and enacted those events. These are the details that were never shown on anyone's TV screen; finally we get to learn what type of people the NASA Mission Controllers really were, and how they handled the demanding tasks that were theirs alone.

Sy Liebergot's page

Mission to Saturn - Cassini and the Huygens Probe

David M. Harland

290 pages

Springer-Praxis
2002

ISBN: 1-85233-656-0

Mission to Saturn reviews the exploration of Saturn, from the discoveries of the early astronomers through telescopes to the robotic probes and fly-bys of the late 1970s and early 1980s. It then goes on to place our present knowledge in the context of the Cassini-Huygens mission, which is due to enter orbit around Saturn in 2004. This joint US/European venture will make a four-year orbital tour of the Saturnian system, with one highlight being the descent of the Huygens Probe into the atmosphere of Titan, the largest of the system's satellites which - possibly - is laced with the complex molecules which, on Earth, were the precursors to life. The book explains how the mission was planned, how it will operate and how its observations will revolutionise our knowledge and understanding of the Saturnian system.

Creating the International Space Station

David M. Harland and John E. Catchpole

400 pages

Springer-Praxis
2002

ISBN: 1-85233-202-6

Creating the International Space Station is a comprehensive and highly readable account of the greatest engineering project in the history of mankind. It starts with a review of the Skylab, Salyut and Mir space stations and the role of the Space Shuttle, and then relates how the spacefaring nations decided to collaborate to the design and build the ISS. A flight-by-flight description of its orbital assembly conveys the magnitude of the task. Finally, there is a look a head to the future of the ISS and the possibility of a dream coming true - colonies in space.

The Earth In Context - A Guide to the Solar System

David M. Harland

450 pages

Springer-Praxis
2001

ISBN: 1-85233-375-8

The Earth In Context tells a story of scientific discovery with two interwoven strands: one tracing the development of knowledge about Earth's geological history, and the second placing this in the context of our near neighbours in the Solar System. The discovery of plate tectonics has helped geologists to underpin their knowledge of the evolution of the Earth's crust. But what about the other planets? Can we compare what has happened on Earth with other worlds in our Solar System? And what can we learn from those comparisons? Although the geological laws that apply on Earth do not necessarily apply elsewhere, this book explores the intriguing analogues to terrestrial processes that are found in the further reaches of the Solar System. The Earth in Context is an essential reader for anyone interested in learning about our world and our place in the Solar System, and the geological forces that formed - and continue to form - our life today.

Jupiter Odyssey - The story of NASA's Galileo Mission

David M. Harland

448 pages

Springer-Praxis
2000

ISBN: 1-85233-301-4

Focusing on the Galileo Mission, the story relates this remarkable spacecraft's protracted gestation and the ordeal of its long haul out to Jupiter and its ultimate triumph: five years exploration within the Jovian system. The story spans a full quarter of a century, drawing on the press conferences, technical papers and essays of engineers and scientists involved in the mission which provide a real sense of participation as the discoveries poured in - it brings the mission of the Galileo spacecraft to life and provides a more engaging account than would simply be achieved by recounting scientific results. The book concludes with a snapshot "look ahead" into the Cassini flyby of Jupiter in December 2000 - and was released to coincide with this media event.

Exploring the Moon - The Apollo Expeditions

David M. Harland

411 pages

Springer-Praxis
1999

ISBN: 1-85233-099-6

Exploring The Moon is a travelog; it follows the Apollo astronauts as they practised "lunar field geology". Accordingly, the three "J"-missions which each spent three days on the Moon, are prominently covered. The text draws upon the transcripts (as listed in the "Apollo Lunar Surface Journal") and is illustrated "in context" with the Hasselblad pictures shot at that time and location. In addition, rarely-seen panoramas were assembled especially for this book.

Chinese translation

The Space Shuttle - Roles, Missions And Accomplishments

David M. Harland

554 pages

Wiley-Praxis
1998

ISBN: 0471981389

The Space Shuttle: Roles, Missions and Accomplishments explains, for the first time, the scientific contribution that the Space Shuttle has made to the international space programme. He focuses on the utility of the Space Shuttle instead of its development and, rather than employ a mission log format, each chapter is devoted to a specific type of operation, and the missions are discussed in this context.

The Mir Space Station - A Precursor To Space Colonisation

David M. Harland

426 pages

Wiley-Praxis
1997

ISBN: 0471975877

The Mir Space Station reviews the beginnings of the Russian space station programme, and the highly successful flights of Salyuts 6 and 7, and presents an up-to-date, comprehensive, chronological review of the construction and operation of Mir from an engineering perspective. Mir is clearly seen to be an evolutionary outgrowth of the Salyut experience. The book outlines the design and construction of Mir, providing detailed descriptions of its structure, environmental, power supply and manoeuvring systems. The operation of the Mir complex is presented in detail, with a comprehensive chronological summary of activities to launch, dock, commission and adapt the various modules.

Short listed for the 1997 Eugene M. Emme Astronautical Literature Award


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