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Coats of Arms, Bookplate & Heraldry

COMBERBACH of England

COMBERBACH?

 

Unidentified

 

ARMS - 3 bars azure, on a canton azure a fleur-de-lis argent.

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: A family history scroll claiming this to be the most ancient.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

Roger Comberbach

 

ARMS - Barry of six ermine and sable, on a canton azure a fleur-de-lis or.

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: Burke's General Armory under Swetenham.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

Roger Comberbach's widow Helen. Granted 1771.

 

ARMS - Ermine three bars azure on a canton of the last a fleur-del-lis argent [impaling her arms].

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

COMBERBACK - Co. Chester 1771 - Burke's General Armory 1884 ed. p. 219

 

Authority: Monument St. Michaels Church Chester.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

James Comberbach Mayor of Chester 1727.

 

ARMS - Barry of six ermine and azure on a canton gules a fleur-de-lis or.

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: Monument St. Johns Church Chester.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

John Comberbach's daughter Elizabeth

 

ARMS - Barry six ermine and azure on a canton argent a fleur-de-lis gules.

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: Monument of Henry Bennet, St. Peter's Church Chester.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

John Comberbach of Haughton 1779.

 

ARMS - Azure, two bars ermine, on a canton argent a fleur-de-lis.

CREST - A cubit arm erect, vested and cuffed, holding a fleur-de-lis

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: From his seal, in the possession of George William Marshall.

 

 

COMBERBACH

 

John Comberbach of Haughton 1779.

 

ARMS - Azure, two bars ermine, on a canton argent a fleur-de-lis.

CREST - A cubit arm erect, vested and cuffed, holding a fleur-de-lis

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: From his seal, in the possession of George William Marshall.

 

 

CUMBERLEGE of England

Marshall remarked that one of his reasons for considering the names Comberbach and Cumberlege identical is the similarity of the arms. John Cumberlege, was a subscriber to Plot's Natural history of Staffordshire, and his arms figure on the folding title to that work, viz. Barry of six ermine and sable, on a canton or a fleur-de-lis gules.    The Rev. S. F. Cumberlege, who claims to be of the same family, now bears this coat, and for his crest, a fleur-de-lis between two feathers, with a motto, Vouloir ce que Dieu veut.

CUMBERLEGE

 

John Cumberlege MB

 

ARMS - Barry of six ermine and sable on a canton or a fleur-de-lis gules.

CREST -

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: A subscriber to Plot's Natural history of Staffordshire, and his arms figure on the folding title to that work.

 

 

Rev. Samuel Francis CUMBERLEGE, MA

Parish Priest of St Mary, Woburn, Bedfordshire 16 Jun 1856 - 14 Jan 1874; of Christ's College, Cambridge, 1835; ordained 1835; curate of Leighton Buzzard; Vicar of Astwood [Buckinghamshire], 1839-1856; died Friday 10 Feb 1899 aged 87.

 

 

ARMS - Barry of six ermine and sable on a canton or a fleur-de-lis gules.

CREST - A fleur-de-lis between two feathers.

MOTTO - VOLOIR CE QUE DIEU VENT

 

Authority: G.W. Marshall, Collections for a Genealogical Account of the family of Comberbach p.8

 

 

CUMBERLEDGE

 

Unknown, Co. Staffordshire

 

ARMS - Barry of six ermine and sable on a canton or a fleur-de-lis gules.

CREST - A unicorn's head erased azure.

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: Burke's General Armory - 1884 Edition p.251

 

 

CUMBERLEGE

 

Cecil Francis, of Balliol House, Putney, London, 1955

 

ARMS - Barry of six Ermine and Sable on a Canton Or a Fleur de Lys Gules.

CREST - On a Wreath Argent and Sable A Fleur de Lys Gules between two Ostrich Feathers Argent quilled Sable.

MOTTO -

 

 

 

Authority: The College of Arms, London, England

 

 

CUMBERBATCH of Barbados

CUMBERBATCH

 

Abraham CUMBERBATCH

 

ARMS - Gules, an eagle displayed between three trefoils.

CREST - An eagle's head couped.

MOTTO - NE TENTES AUT PERFICE.

 

There were three generations of these names. The first died 1753, the second 1785, and the third 1796.

 

Authority: His bookplate: (Caribbeana Vol:3 Supplement, p. 21; No. 179. From the collection of Sir A. Frank at the British Museum). Burke's General Armory 1884 ed. p.251

Monument in Bristol Cathedral.

The above coat of arms is available at www.family-crests.com record number 21210.

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Coats of Arms

Coats of arms began in the 12th century for military, social or authoritative purposes. They were used as colours and logos in the same way that colours and logos are used to distinguish individuals and teams today, whether in sport or in business. They can be important in genealogy.

Sharing a family name with an armigerous person or ancestor with the same name does not automatically confer the right to use their arms. There are inheritance rules which need to be verified with the Heralds.


Heraldry

Once these logos began being worn on sheilds then heraldry was born. During the 13th century France, England and Scotland established Colleges of Arms to regulate the use of arms. They then undertook the designing of the arms - the blazoning - and the registration of arms.

The English College of Arms has 13 officers:

  1. Garter King of Arms;
  2. Clarenceux King of Arms;

  3. Norroy & Ulster King of Arms;

  4. Chester Herald;

  5. Lancaster Herald;

  6. Richmond Herald;

  7. Somerset Herald;

  8. Windsor Herald;

  9. York Herald*;

  10. Bluemantle Pursuivant;

  11. Portcullis Pursuivant;

  12. Rouge Croix Pursuivant*;

  13. Rouge Dragon Pursuivant.

In previous days Heralds would make visitations to collect proof of a right to bear arms. Now they prove a right to bear arms for claimants and design new arms for new applicants.

* George William Marshall held both of these offices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ne tentes aut perfice

This motto used by Cumberbatch of Barbados, was also used by the Electric Telegraph Company.

The Electric Telegraph Company was formed by Sir William Fothergill Cooke and Joseph Lewis Ricardo in 1846, four years after Cooke had launched the first commercial telegraph system between Paddington and West Drayton in London England. That line had been installed in 1839 but, up to 1842, had carried only railway messages.


The partnership between William Fothergill Cooke and Sir Charles Wheatstone [of Wheatstoine Bridge fame], which resulted in the invention of the electric telegraph patented in 1837, was never an easy one, and was effectively over by 1843. Thereafter, Cooke carried forward their joint patents as a business and Wheatstone merely took a royalty payment for all lines constructed under them.

The company went on to lay telegraph networks in many parts of England and laid submarine cables to Holland, thus offering links through to much of Europe. This international expansion was done through a specially formed associate company - the International Telegraph Company - with which the ETC merged in 1855 to become the Electric and International Telegraph Company.


In 1870 the company and all its assets were transferred to the government, as a result of nationalisation under the Telegraph Act, January 28, 1868. The General Post Office (GPO) then undertook the responsibility for these networks.

In 1981, the British Telecoms Act transferred this responsibility from the General Post Office, thereby creating two separate corporations. I joined the GPO/BT in 1980.

Source: BT


Copyright 2003-2008 Robert Cumberbatch.             Cumberbatch family history site last updated: 13 December, 2007            |  Privacy Policy  |  Site Map  |  Contact Me