SKELTON - IN - CLEVELAND
IN HISTORY


Page 31.

THE OVERSEERS OF THE POOR.
HOW THE RATEPAYERS MONEY WAS SPENT.
SETTLEMENT AND REMOVAL.
Under the Poor Law each small Parish was obliged to look after its own Paupers. Therefore it became essential for the Overseers, who administered the system, to know which people they were responsible for. On behalf of the other ratepayers, they would go to great lengths to avoid giving "relief" to those who did not qualify. Everyone had a Parish of "Settlement", which was usually where they were born. To move from Parish to Parish required a certificate. Settlement rights in a different Parish could only be acquired by serving an apprenticeship there; working there for over a year; owning or renting property with a rateable value over £10. Women took the Parish of their husband on marriage. If at any time a non-qualified person became reliant on Poor relief, the Overseers would apply to the magistrates for a "removal order", which sometimes required a long examination of the claimant's life history.
Journey to Guisbro' to meet Castleton Overseers to hear the case from Counsel  
relating G Elliott's Settlement                                                            1s 6d
Paid for removal of Stephen Kitching and wife to Growman Bridge £1 3s 0d

Journey to Guisbro concerning Stephen Kitching returning from his Parish
to Skelton again after his removal                                                    1s 6d
Paid Mr Clarke for a Summons for Elizabeth Binks removal         2s 0d
APPRENTICESHIPS.
It was part of the Overseers duties to arrange apprenticeships for the children of paupers. A legal agreement was made by which Indentures were signed binding the child to a period of training of seven years or more. The tradesman undertook to feed and clothe the apprentice in return for his labour to the age of 24.
Journey to Guisbro to bind Robert Jolly's son Apprentice.               1s 6d
Paid sundry expences with Indenture concerning binding James Mawer       
apprentice to Jacob Honeyman                                                     13s 6d
PASSENGERS.
There are many references to payment for "passengers", presumably those who were in the process of "removal" to their own place of settlement and also those who held a "pass".
Paid to 3 women and 7 children, soldiers wifes with a regular pass.        1s 6d
Paid William Watson, Constable, for relieving passengers                  3s 0d
Paid to James Crusher for a disabled seaman                                     2d
Paid relief to a traveling woman being sick                                        5s 6d
Paid to 3 ship-wrecked sailors                                                         1s 6d
TREATMENT OF THE INSANE.
Paid William Lynas for keeping watch over William Emmerson 7 nights 10s 6d
Paid William Bouteman for conveying William Emmerson to                       
York Asylum                                                                             £3 0s 0d
Paid to the Governors of the York Asylum for William Emmerson   £5 10s 6d

Paid Mary Emmerson expenses to York to look after her husband           7s 0d
Paid to Lunatic Asylum at York for William Emmerson funeral  £14 0s 0d
INCOME FROM THE DEAD.
Received by Sale of the late Newark Pearsons Goods                    £3 5s 6d
VARIETY OF OTHER PAYMENTS.
Paid to Thomas Boulton of Guisbro when his Horse died                £1 1s 0d

Paid relief to Richard Morgan's wife when he was soldiering                19s 6d
Paid Ralph Weatherill Window Duty                                             3s 6d

Paid for Ralph Weatherill cow being twice in the penfold                     1s 4d
Paid to Robert Lengs children when he was from home                        2s 0d
On the 21st December 1836 after the start of the Workhouse System the following letter was sent to Overseer, Joseph Tate from Moorsholm.
Dear Sir,
           As the time is now advanced and cold winter begins to blow, that a promise was made by the Vestry of your township to lay on the shilling per week that was taken off my pay when winter came. I therefore make bold by writing a note to you to have the goodness to lay my complaint before the Vestry to solicit their kindness to lay on the shilling again for which I shall be greatly obliged and ever in duty bound to pray for thee.
                                                      Yours Jane Robinson.

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